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The People’s Mosquito Project announces air show attendance schedule

29 July 2014
The People's Mosquito

The People’s Mosquito

 

 

 

 

 

From The People’s Mosquito (TPM) — the noble effort to build (not rebuild) an original de Havilland Mosquito for the public trust — we have the latest news. The TPM’s presence continues its growth with the announcement of  The People’s Mosquito’s representation at upcoming air shows :)

TPM personnel will answer questions, talk about the DH Mosquito, and just about anything else (they are quite motivated and knowledgeable) as well as discuss the just made available fund-raising merchandise for TPM.

Below is  a reposting of the most recent announcement  of  The People’s Mosquito :)

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Airshow attendance dates 2014

27/07/2014

We’re excited to announce dates for forthcoming events at which we will be present. We hope we can get to meet you at one of these.

At each event there will be at least one or two of us from the team –  and in some cases more – to answer any of your questions regarding the progress of the restoration project to get a Mosquito permanently back in British skies. Unfortunately we won’t be selling merchandise on our stand this time, but will have a catalogue featuring the products in our shop bit.ly/TPMShop, and will be taking orders. We will be welcoming donations too, and spreading the word about the project – and hopefully meeting new supporters. We also hope to have some of the original remains of Mosquito RL249 – on which the restoration is being based.

We will be announcing further dates in the coming days and will add our stand number and position, if possible, as soon as we know them.

Confirmed:

LAHC

East Kirkby Airshow – Saturday 2nd August

 

 

 

 

Sywell logo

Sywell Great War Airshow – Sunday 17th August

 

 

 

 

East Kirkby 3 LancsEast Kirkby “Once in a Lanc Time” – Tuesday 2nd September

 

 

 

 

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Screamin’ Sasquatch — the radial and jet engine powered 1929 Taperwing Waco

28 July 2014

Screamin’ Sasquatch — the radial and jet engine powered 1929 Taperwing Waco

Screamin' Sasquatch — photo provided by Jack Link's

Screamin’ Sasquatch — photo and copyright by Steve Schulte

New for this airshow season is the rare mixed engine 1929 Taperwing Waco powered by a conventional reciprocating radial engine as well as a turbojet — the “Screamin’ Sasquatch” which is also the mascot of Jack Link’s Beef Jerky. The fruition of the Screamin’ Sasquatch is a result of the efforts of Jack Link’s Beef Jerky as well as John Klatt Airshows.

Turning the propeller is a Pratt & Whitney 985 Wasp Junior (450 hp/340kW) while burning underneath is a General Electric CJ-610 (3000 pounds thrust/13.34kN) turbojet. Modifications to the vintage aircraft were made, of course, and most notably are overall strengthening for the additional dynamic loads as well as relocating the cockpit to the rear by three feet to allow for extra fuel capacity (the CJ-610 consumes 100 gallons/~380L per hour). The Taperwing is graceful to see fly as well as a wonder to fly when powered only by the Wasp Junior but is fantastic to see the Screamin’ Sasquatch in flight — a 12 minute in-the-cockpit video during and airshow performance can be seen here. The power-to-weight (P:W) is at or better than 1:1 so the Screamin’ Sasquatch lives up to its name with overtly powerful vertical climbs and hovering which conventional propeller driven aircraft can weakly imitate, at best.

Seeing Screamin’ Sasquatch couldn’t be easier as it will be performing at the Boeing Seafair Air Show, at Genesee Park, on the 2nd as well as 3rd of August this year :)

Screamin' Sasquatch — photo provided by Jack Link's

Screamin’ Sasquatch in its element, note the aft displacement of the cockpit in consideration of extra fuel capacity — photo and copyright by Steve Schulte

Screamin' Sasquatch — photo provided by Jack Link's

Screamin’ Sasquatch on a low pass where both engines (recip and jet) are easily seen, and heard! — photo and copyright by Steve Schulte

Screamin' Sasquatch — photo provided by Jack Link's

Screamin’ Sasquatch — photo and copyright by Steve Schulte

Screamin' Sasquatch — photo provided by Jack Link's

Screamin’ Sasquatch — photo and copyright by Steve Schulte

Screamin' Sasquatch — photo provided by Jack Link's

Screamin’ Sasquatch’s GE CJ-610 turbojet engine and tailpipe in profile — photo and copyright by Steve Schulte

Screamin' Sasquatch — photo provided by Jack Link's

Screamin’ Sasquatch banks away from camera — photo and copyright by Steve Schulte

Thursday will be a post in the words of Jeff Boerboon, pilot of Screamin’ Sasquatch, describing the modifications made to have this 1929 Taperwing Waco become the Screamin’ Sasquatch.

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Sources for the images of this post were thoughtfully provided by the Screamin’ Sasquatch team with the technical information gleaned from this Flying Magazine article.

The Artful Elevators of TIA

25 July 2014

The Artful Elevators of TIA

27° 58′ 49″ N / 82° 32′ 04″ W

TIA Elevators — photo by Joseph May

Helpful reminder slips for the taking are at the parking level elevator stops — photo by Joseph May

Tampa International Airport (TIA) is a lovely facility for the traveler. The main terminal is the hub with each airside at the end of an extension from the hub like a spoke of a wheel. Short term parking occupy the upper five levels with the lower three levels in the usual order of baggage on the first level, ticketing on the second and access to the airsides on the third level.  This third, or main level, is spacious and filled with stores, eateries and information. Signs are well placed so the traveler can easily find what needs finding. The convenience of parking the car and taking an elevator directly to the desired level cannot be overstated — no dragging baggage for what seems a long time (Terminal 3 at JFK comes to mind as well as any terminal at MIA, PBI, FLL, ORL…). Orientation is easy as the stack of eight levels is divided into a red side and a blue side with each side having a pair of elevator banks with each elevator bank is named for a famous aviator in a  pleasing motif. The red is definitively red and the blue is undeniably blue — and a marvelous way to begin or end a trip :)

 

TIA Elevators — photo by Joseph May

Each or the four elevator banks has six elevators as shown here with the Yeager bank — photo by Joseph May

TIA Elevators — photo by Joseph May

The Sikorsky bank on the airport’s red side — photo by Joseph May

TIA Elevators — photo by Joseph May

TIA’s Armstrong elevator bank — photo by Joseph May

TIA Elevators — photo by Joseph May

The Earhart bank is on TIA’s blue side — photo by Joseph May

Curtiss A-8 — the 1930s attack aircraft experiment

23 July 2014

Curtiss A-8 — the 1930s attack aircraft experiment

The U.S. Army Air Corps compared air cooled radial engine powered aircraft versus in-line liquid cooled engines in attack aircraft designs, during the 1930s, and the Curtiss A-8 was one of these designs. Powered by a Curtiss V-1570-31 Conqueror (600 hp/~450kW) the A-8 carried its pilot–observer/rear gunner nearly 500 miles at 153 mph/245kph. Marked by two glazed tandem cockpits it had a semi-sleek appearance though with distracting wing bracing. Aside from the rear position armed with a single 0.30 caliber machine guns there were  four forward firing machine 0.30 caliber machine guns with the primary offensive armament of a four bomb mounting points for a total of nearly 500 lbs. /~230kg.

 

Curtiss A-8 — San Diego Air & Space Museum photo from the Charles M. Daniels Collection

Curtiss A-8 — San Diego Air & Space Museum photo from the Charles M. Daniels Collection

The A-8 design was phased out of the competition in the late 1930s with all models sent to be scrapped and the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force has this fact sheet.

The Yompers — winning a modern war on foot the hard way

21 July 2014

The Yompers — winning a modern war on foot the hard way

The Yompers: with 45 Commando in the Falklands War, Ian Gardiner, 2012, ISBN 978-1-84884-441-4, 208 pp.

The Yompers: with 45 Commando in the Falklands War by Ian Gardiner with jacket design by Jon Wilkinson

The Yompers: with 45 Commando in the Falklands War by Ian Gardiner with jacket design by Jon Wilkinson

We have read Ian Gardiner before with his other two excellent books and this one keeps to his high standard of excellent writing of his experiences, now as X-Ray Company Commander in 45 Commando, as well as his wisdom and practical philosophical oversight. In Yompers the author covers logistics through tactics, politics through training as well as humour (we will use the Queen’s English spelling out of respect) and cigarettes.

Gardiner also has much in humour interspersed throughout Yompers and in fact succinctly explains why that trait is vital in when soldiers prepare to go into combat. Succinctness with spectacular writing marks Gardiner’s books as revelatory and educational as the reader not only learns of how it was like for individuals involved but also the strategic context of the issue at hand.

The overthrust of the story is how 45 Commando marched across unimaginably harsh terrain across East Falkland island to fight two night battles securing the western flank of Port Stanley. The story is an awestriking one. Since the heavy lift helicopter capacity was lost due to Argentinian attacks 45 Commando had to “yomp” (i.e., march) with each man carrying a load of 120–150 pounds (55–70kg) over terrain that alternatively had them sinking up to their shins or traversing boot eating stone runs. As noted by Gardiner, this was the first battle fought without motorized vehicles since the invention of the reciprocating engine. From the first day of the march feet and clothing were not dry until its end so day after day men of 45 Commando never slept well. Making matters worse the helicopter resupply was unreliable so food was often short in supply. Artillery ammunition had to be carefully thought out prior to commencing battle and boots often had to be liberated from the Argentine soldiers. But intense night assaults were made and Gardiner excels in describing the intensity of command decision making (advised by others but alone in responsibility) as well as the first hand accounts which are riveting. Only a thinking person who has experienced the event can write this descriptively and informatively.

Some of the above sounds counterintuitive and perhaps so it is but it is how the history unfurled. Gardiner writes an excellent prelude and summary illustrating the mistakes both countries made which brought them to war. His observations regarding the training of the Royal Marines and his comparison to the Argentinian officer corps could not be more stark. Some Argentinians fought well and some did not but the Falkland’s War was a close fought affair with remarkable gallantry on both sides which Gardiner freely acknowledges. His reflection on serving the Queen is both parsimonious, realistic as well as saturated with wry humour.

This book, like his others, is happily challenging to write a short review of as each page is filled with insight or overview — more often both. So, much has to be left out of the material covered by Gardiner but to give an impression of the gamut addressed, and addressed well:

  • Why, in his experience gained in Dhofar, his company armed themselves with nineteen light machine guns (7.62mm) when the normal complement was nine
  • The unsung heroes of Britain’s merchant marine
  • How the Argentine military thought as well as how the British military thought
  • The incredible logistical effort to get man and equipment away is a short time and how some of the proverbial knots were untied along the route
  • How unexploded bombs were left in medical areas as men continued their work to save lives and heal wounds
  • The importance of air assets and how acute the feeling when they are not available
  • The American military has the SNAFU, TARFU and FUBAR whereas the UK military has the AMFU, SAMFU and CMFU :)

This book should be read by historians and should be read by those who study leadership alike. The maps are drawn by the author and the many insightful images come from the Trustees of the Royal Marines Museum as well as the author and friends.

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Additional books by Ian Gardiner and reviews:

In the Service of the Sultan: a first hand account of the Dhofar Insurgency, Ian Gardiner, 2006 (reprinted several times since), ISBN 978-1-84415-467-8, 189 pp.

The Flatpack Bombers: the Royal Navy & the Zeppelin Menace, Ian Gardiner, 2009, ISBN 9781848840713, 224 pp.

Further:

Ian Gardiner is an interesting fellow who writes and talks about so much more — these can be investigated at this link where his other articles are equally well written and intriguing.

 

 

Air New Zealand’s 787-9 stretched Dreamliner encore

17 July 2014

Air New Zealand’s 787-9 stretched Dreamliner encore

Air New Zealand’s first Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner — photo courtesy of Air New Zealand

Nocturnal view of Air New Zealand’s first Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner — photo courtesy of Air New Zealand

As Boeing demonstrates and displays the newest Dreamliner version, the stretched 787-9 at Farnborough Air Show this week, Air New Zealand has flown the first of ten to be purchased to Auckland. Preparations and training will see the stretched Dreamliner begin to ply the Auckland–Perth route commencing on 15 October. Shortly Air New Zealand will have at least 10 of these stretched Dreamliners connecting points across — as well as within — the Pacific Rim. The all black fuselages, with the Kiwi symbols of the koru and silver fern and white wings, will spend most of the their flight hours over blue water while looking positively striking at the airside.

Air New Zealand’s first Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner — photo courtesy of Air New Zealand

Air New Zealand’s first Boeing stretched 787-9 Dreamliner in Seattle’s twilight showing off the black fuselage and white wings to best advantage — photo courtesy of Air New Zealand

Boeing 787-9 landing at Auckland  — photo courtesy of Air New Zealand

Air New Zealand’s Boeing 787-9 landing at Auckland — photo courtesy of Air New Zealand

Air New Zealand's first Boeing B- 787 Dreamliner — photo courtesy of Air New Zealand

Rob McDonald (Chief Financial Officer, Air New Zealand) on the left, next is Bruce Parton (Chief Operations Officer, Air New Zealand) and Capt. David Morgan (Chief Flight Operations and Safety Officer) on the right as well as two flight attendants after landing their new 787-9 in Auckland — photo courtesy of Air New Zealand

The main article, describing Air New Zealand’s unveiling of the stretched Dreamliner, posted on Monday this week with many more photos and information :)

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