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V-22 Osprey walkaround — last half

2 September 2015

39° 59′ 30″ N / 75° 34′ 43″ W

Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey at the American Helicopter Museum — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey at the American Helicopter Museum view of the starboard tail fin — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

This is the second portion of this walkaround, please see the previous post for the first portion. Additionally, this Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey is displayed on the grounds of the American Helicopter Museum.

Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey at the American Helicopter Museum — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey at the American Helicopter Museum port wing and tiltrotor/proprotor (note the differential deflection of the flaperon in regard to the flap) — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey at the American Helicopter Museum — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey at the American Helicopter Museum port tiltrotor — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey at the American Helicopter Museum — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey at the American Helicopter Museum detail of the tiltrotor/wing joint — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey at the American Helicopter Museum — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey at the American Helicopter Museum view showing the wing mounted above the fuselage (along with the fuselage sponsons making for an optimally dimensioned cargo volume) — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey at the American Helicopter Museum — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey at the American Helicopter Museum — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey at the American Helicopter Museum — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey at the American Helicopter Museum port proprotor (non metallic and light in weight) — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey at the American Helicopter Museum — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey at the American Helicopter Museum starboard side fuselage — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey at the American Helicopter Museum — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey at the American Helicopter Museum detail of the forward portion of the tiltrotor/wing joint — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey at the American Helicopter Museum — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey at the American Helicopter Museum starboard proprotor — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey at the American Helicopter Museum — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey at the American Helicopter Museum — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Vietnam War Helicopter Art

1 September 2015

Vietnam War Helicopter Art: U.S. Army Rotor Aircraft, John Brennan, ISBN 978-0-8117-1031-2, 199 pp., 275+ photos

Vietnam War Helicopter Art US Army Rotor Aircraft by John Brennan (front cover)

Vietnam War Helicopter Art: U.S. Army Rotor Aircraft by John Brennan (front cover)

Author John Brennan does great and valuable work regarding aviation’s history. He has preserved the artwork on aircraft which airmen through the ages have used to provide humor or a piece of home or something else.

The art is organized by helicopter type, each with technical descriptions and telling facts. The volume of art is great and skills range from the mundane to masterful. 400 Chinooks alone had art work on their fuselages. Snakes, hogs, slicks and more — these aircraft have their names, unique art, humor or cynicism boldly on display in a war zone. The variety of helicopter missions as well as art is incredible to behold and we have Brennan to thank for this overview.

Some of huge number of gems in this book are:

  • the 116th Assault Helicopter Company helicopters flew with yellow jackets (wasps) on their noses but with individual names on each Huey
  • the Huey which became the “Electric Banana” when it had its tail boom replaced but flew into combat before the yellow primer could be painted olive drab
  • the rare Chinook “A+” model
  • Hueys armed with TOWs and multiple tank kills
  • a Tarhe armed with instant landing zone producing “Daisy Cutters”
  • Cobras, Shawnees and LOACHes in all manner of names, symbolism and missions
  • rocket pods expertly painted up as beer cans

Brennan again has met the high expectations he has set for himself with Vietnam War Helicopter Art and could hardly do better — except, perhaps, to produce Volume 2 ;)

Vietnam War Helicopter Art US Army Rotor Aircraft by John Brennan (back cover)

Vietnam War Helicopter Art: U.S. Army Rotor Aircraft by John Brennan (back cover)

Vietnam War Helicopter Art is available at the usual places as well as Stackpole Books.

V-22 Osprey walkaround — first half

31 August 2015

39° 59′ 30″ N / 75° 34′ 43″ W

Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey at the American Helicopter Museum — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey at the American Helicopter Museum — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Osprey — Bell Boeing’s aircraft which is the first tiltrotor entering production. Currently flown in the USAF as the CV-22 and the USMC as the MV-22 it is gaining a reputation for long range medivac and transport well beyond helicopter ranges as well as with greater speed.

Only two Ospreys are on public display and this one is the third of six V-22 Osprey prototypes which is located at the American Helicopter Museum. Transition from conventional to vertical flight is done by rotating the engine/proprotor combination at each wingtip. Rotation angles are 97.5º, allowing for reverse flight when needed. The proprotor is lightweight and each can engine drive both proprotors to prevent crashing should an engine be lost — though the low weight of the composite material proprotor design has the Osprey suffering when under autorotation (though it has a glide ration of 4.5:1). The propwash is extremely powerful and such that a minimal vertical separation of 25 feet between Ospreys in flight is mandatory as is not using the starboard fuselage door for paratrooper delivery (the rear ramp is instead used).

Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey at the American Helicopter Museum — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey at the American Helicopter Museum with stairs to view into the cockpit — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey at the American Helicopter Museum — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey at the American Helicopter Museum has the tiltrotors partly tilted (one can see how the powerful and heated exhaust could affect certain runway surfaces and flight decks) — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey at the American Helicopter Museum — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey at the American Helicopter Museum view of the twin tail — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey at the American Helicopter Museum — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey at the American Helicopter Museum aft ramp making it a versatile in regard to cargo as well as troops — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey at the American Helicopter Museum — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey at the American Helicopter Museum starboard side view and note the full deflection of the wing flap — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey at the American Helicopter Museum — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey at the American Helicopter Museum port side view (note the sponson houses the main landing gear allowing for maximum usable volume in the cargo bay — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Exhaust heat from  each  6150 hp turboshaft engine is massive and, like the F-35B Lightning II, requires improved flight decks for naval operations afloat. Less obvious advanced features are an airframe of 43% composite materials, folding proprotor blades and the wing pivoting 90º for stowage aboard ship.

Each Osprey is crewed by two pilots and two crew chiefs and typically carries 24 troops or 20,000 pounds internally/15,000 pounds externally. Range can be as far as 1011 miles at a cruising speed of 277 mph – with a get out-of-Dodge speed of 316 mph.

Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey at the American Helicopter Museum — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey at the American Helicopter Museum view of the starboard wing — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey at the American Helicopter Museum — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey at the American Helicopter Museum profile view — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey at the American Helicopter Museum — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey at the American Helicopter Museum starboard tiltrotor and proprotor — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

This Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey is displayed on the grounds of the American Helicopter Museum and the next post will finalize this walkaround :)

Video: Capt. Eric ‘Winkle’ Brown – Axis aircraft, ejection systems and Schräge Musik

29 August 2015

travelforaircraft:

The thoughts of who may be the world’s most experienced pilots regarding WW II Luftwaffe ejection seat systems as well as Schrage musik…

Originally posted on The People's Mosquito:

In April we spoke to our Patron, Capt. Eric ‘Winkle’ Brown. He discussed some of the captured German aircraft he flew and in particular talked about ejection systems and Schräge Musik.

We are pleased to present that conversation to you now in the following video. Warning: some of the material contained in the video is suitable for mature audiences only.


Thanks to Mark Bloomfield for the generous loan of his time, equipment and expertise, and also to Allan Udy of Historic Aviation Film Unit for providing the superb Mosquito audio featured in the video.

View original

Pan Am: an Airline and Its Aircraft

28 August 2015

Pan Am: an Airlines and Its Aircraft, R.E.G. Davies (Mike Machat, illustrator), 1987, ISBN o-517-56639-7, 90 pp.

Pan Am: an Airlines and Its Aircraft by R.E.G. Davies (Mike Machat, illustrator) front cover

Pan Am: an Airlines and Its Aircraft by R.E.G. Davies (Mike Machat, illustrator) front cover

Davies and Machat have, in only 90 pages, created a treasure chest of Pan Am’s history. Davies has assembled lessor know though significant facts, as well as insight, in superbly written text and well-directed tables. Machat has illustrated each of the 36 specifically covered aircraft superbly, including special silver-grey ink representing bare aluminum, with the line drawing of a Boeing 747 as background for spectacular effect and comprehension of airline advancement through the years. What years they were! All 64 of Pan Am as an airline with Juan Trippe as the force of evolution which resulted in milestones we take for granted today (wide body airliners, affordable passenger travel, a complete logistics network, long haul overseas flights and the concept of flight crews as passenger ship crews).

Davies did not choose to write the easy part of the history. He instead chose to write the history objectively and without the temptation to cheer. This objectivity and completeness of research are what makes this book a must for any library or reader of aviation’s history. Thankfully, the author is gifted with reducing facts to an accurate synthesis — for example, noting that Pan Am purchased 982 aircraft (plus 20 with the dissolution of (SCADTA) with 103 being their famed flying boats (though providing tables in each aircraft type of the construction number, registration number and name). The perspective on flying boats is exceptional as are Machat’s illustrations of routes and heritage. Images from the archives of Pan Am’s and the National Air & Space Museum complete the Pan Am: an Airlines and Its Aircraft.

Pan Am: an Airlines and Its Aircraft by R.E.G. Davies (Mike Machat, illustrator) back cover

Pan Am: an Airlines and Its Aircraft by R.E.G. Davies (Mike Machat, illustrator) back cover

The Flying Banana walkaround — 2 of 2

26 August 2015

39° 59′ 32″ N / 75° 34′ 46″ W

Piasecki CH-21C Shawnee at the American Helicopter Museum — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Piasecki CH-21C Shawnee at the American Helicopter Museum — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

The first part of this walkaround is the previous post :) Additionally, this helicopter is displayed on the grounds of the American Helicopter Museum.

Piasecki CH-21C Shawnee at the American Helicopter Museum — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Piasecki CH-21C Shawnee at the American Helicopter Museum — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Piasecki CH-21C Shawnee at the American Helicopter Museum — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Piasecki CH-21C Shawnee at the American Helicopter Museum copilot position — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

blog Shawnee_MG_8189

Piasecki CH-21C Shawnee at the American Helicopter Museum pilot position — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Piasecki CH-21C Shawnee at the American Helicopter Museum — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Piasecki CH-21C Shawnee at the American Helicopter Museum detail of copilot’s side of the central console — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Piasecki CH-21C Shawnee at the American Helicopter Museum — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Piasecki CH-21C Shawnee at the American Helicopter Museum nose gear — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Piasecki CH-21C Shawnee at the American Helicopter Museum — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Piasecki CH-21C Shawnee at the American Helicopter Museum forward rotor — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Piasecki CH-21C Shawnee at the American Helicopter Museum — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Piasecki CH-21C Shawnee at the American Helicopter Museum aft left fuselage — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Piasecki CH-21C Shawnee at the American Helicopter Museum — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Piasecki CH-21C Shawnee at the American Helicopter Museum access and cooling port on the fuselage left — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Piasecki CH-21C Shawnee at the American Helicopter Museum — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Piasecki CH-21C Shawnee at the American Helicopter Museum inside surface of right rear fin — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Piasecki CH-21C Shawnee at the American Helicopter Museum — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Piasecki CH-21C Shawnee at the American Helicopter Museum aft rotor — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Piasecki CH-21C Shawnee at the American Helicopter Museum — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Piasecki CH-21C Shawnee at the American Helicopter Museum right fuselage side — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Piasecki CH-21C Shawnee at the American Helicopter Museum — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Piasecki CH-21C Shawnee at the American Helicopter Museum — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

 

 

Turbulence

25 August 2015

Turbulence, Capt. John W. van Kleeff, 2014, ISBN 978-1-49903-508-7, 190 pp.

Turbulence by Capt. John W. van Kleeff,

Turbulence by Capt. John W. van Kleeff

Beginning with fire trucks on the runway, and ending with, “…that was to fly” van Kleeff describes his life and career as a commercial pilot. Amazingly, Captain van Kleeff speaks several languages, has had a handful of marriages, flown to more countries than most can name and is capable with his hands to an enviable degree. He has also flown, managed and experienced commercial aviation to an extent that most in the field have not.

This is not the book to learn details about specific aircraft although the author flew BAC 111, Boeing 727, Boeing 737 as well as Airbus A300 airliners in a career which culminated as pilot-in-command (PIC) with American Airlines. The most tantalizing detail in this regard is his descriptive recollection of a childhood cockpit visit during a flight in a Boeing 377 Stratocruiser.

This is a book to learn about achieving PIC status though without military flight training flying. This is a book to learn of many of the facets of the flying industry — including why some pilots are so much better than others. This is the book to learn of the life style of a corporate as well as commercial pilot.

This is also a sometimes intimate book about a full life rich in experience as much as difficulties. The handful of marriages have been mentioned but the author’s life is marked by a father sending him away, at the age of 6, for unknown reason. Van Kleeff has many salient observations regarding his life in Europe as a result, as well as a continuing account of many cities and countries. Of special interest are his vivid recollections of the Middle East where he did much of his corporate piloting, especially in the BAC 111. The bin Laden family is mentioned as is younger years Osama as are many sheiks, princes and princesses. How the aircraft was used and loaned out to many prominent and powerful (very prominent, very powerful) Americans is eyebrow raising, not to mention a bit concerning. The BAC 111 modifications are mentioned, though not in detail, which converted these short range aircraft into long range aircraft.

Van Kleeff’s writing style will have the reader soon listening to a grandfather or uncle figure as the tale is told simply and directly with tantalizing details or observations mixed in like exotic spices in an expansive cuisine. This book is a pleasant read about a man who could have lived a disastrous existence but, instead, has an accomplished life and interesting life — a life marked by turbulence.

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As is the publishing business custom, Xlibris provided a copy of this book for an objective review.

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