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The Butch O’Hare F4F Exhibit in Terminal 2 at ORD Backstory

23 March 2017

 

The Butch O’Hare Exhibit in Terminal 2 of O’Hare International Airport—photo by Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Terminal 2 at O’Hare has a wonderfully done exhibit honoring the airport’s namesake, Edward Henry “Butch” O’Hare—with the post on it found here. Happily, as it turns out, it was done in art by a family friend, Moosh Mackenzie, who also credits Don Burg, Kiwi Woodworks, Cushing Printing and Gaylord Architectural. Well done!

The Butch O’Hare Exhibit in Terminal 2 of O’Hare International Airport—photo by Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

The Butch O’Hare Exhibit in Terminal 2 of O’Hare International Airport—photo by Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Super Guppy!

22 March 2017

An Aero Spacelines B-377 Super Guppy sitting on the flightline at Joint Base San Antonio-Randolph TX, in March 2017, which is operated by NASA it has cargo space that is 25 feet in diameter and 111 feet long—U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Stormy Archer

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NASA’s Super Guppy engine starts—NASA image

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NASA’s Super Guppy with a bit of artistic convergence—NASA image

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The volume, and ability to load outsized cargo, of the fuselage is shown well from this aerial perspective (note the crew entry is from the right)—NASA image

New Orleans, LA - Orion EM-1 departs Michoud Assembly Facility for Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The vessel was loaded onto NASA's Super Guppy cargo aircraft.

The NASA Super Guppy readying for departure for the Kennedy Space Center with the Orion EM-1 capsule—NASA image

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Fog enhances the other-world-like quality of the Super Guppy—NASA image

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The Super Guppy on the taxi way beginning another flight mission for NASA—NASA image

New Orleans, LA - Orion EM-1 departs Michoud Assembly Facility for Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The vessel was loaded onto NASA's Super Guppy cargo aircraft.

The Super Guppy unlatched—NASA image

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The Super Guppy’s cargo deck looking forward from the tail—NASA image

New Orleans, LA - Orion EM-1 departs Michoud Assembly Facility for Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The vessel was loaded onto NASA's Super Guppy cargo aircraft.

The Orion EM-1 laded onto the Super Guppy’s cargo deck—NASA image

New Orleans, LA - Orion EM-1 departs Michoud Assembly Facility for Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The vessel was loaded onto NASA's Super Guppy cargo aircraft.

The Orion EM-1 capsule being placed onto the Super Guppy’s cargo deck—NASA image

The heat shield for Orion EM-1 arrives at the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) operated by Space Florida at NASA Kennedy's Space Center.

The Super Guppy at the Kennedy Space Center—NASA image

NASA’s Super Guppy aircraft touches down at the Shuttle Landing Facility at the agency’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, carrying the Orion crew module adapter structural test article (STA). The STA will be offloaded and transported to the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building high bay for further testing. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

NASA’s Super Guppy touching down to deliver a portion of the Orion crew capsule to the Kennedy Space Center—NASA/Kim Shiflett image

Sadly…

21 March 2017

Sadly, we must report the passing of John J. Piazza, Sr. who owned the excellent private collection he shared with the world known as the Armed Forces Military Museum (the museum review is here).

The museum is closed for now as the caretakers work to keep it a unified collection and not one to be pieced out.

Their website, Armed Forces Military Museum, has more information about the future of the museum as well as a proper death notice and obituary for Mr. Piazza. We wish them well as we do the Piazza family—Mr. Piazza was a good Marine his entire adult life.

The Starship Enterprise NCC-1701

20 March 2017

Federation Star Ship USS Enterprise (NCC-1701) model formerly aboard the USS Enterprise (CVN-65)—U.S. Navy image

Federation Starship USS Enterprise (NCC-1701) formerly aboard the USS Enterprise (CVN-65)—U.S. Navy image

Happily, at times, life imitates art. This model was originally donated to the aircraft carrier (recently decommissioned) USS Enterprise (CVN-65). The design of starship is just so cool with its huge engines, primary saucer section and secondary hull which could separate, and idea of exploration. Obviously, the concept of phased array technology had not existed for Gene Roddenberry at the time but the idea of beaming about the place is a heck of a concept which I suppose is based on quantum physics somehow.

The metal model is 15″ x 6″ x 7¼” in size and has resided as an artifact since 2006 in the Naval History and Heritage Command as NHHC 2006-48-4.

 

Federation Starship USS Enterprise (NCC-1701) model formerly aboard the USS Enterprise (CVN-65)—U.S. Navy image

El Eterno Viajero—Saluti!

17 March 2017

 

Marqués de Burgos, the label—Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

The art and two sayings caught our eye and whimsy 🙂

Marqués de Burgos, El Eterno Viajero means The Wanderer Forever :)—Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

A Hellcat and a Bearcat and a Hornet

16 March 2017

 

Cmdr. Frank Weisser (Blue Angles lead solo) with an F6F Hellcat and an F8F Bearcat over the Salton Sea (The Hellcat and Bearcat were the first two aircraft models used by The Blue Angels after their beginning in 1946)—U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Ian Cotter

Cmdr. Frank Weisser (Blue Angles lead solo) with an F6F Hellcat and an F8F Bearcat over the Imperial Valley (The Hellcat and Bearcat were the first two aircraft models used by The Blue Angels after their beginning in 1946)—U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Ian Cotter

Cmdr. Frank Weisser (Blue Angles lead solo) with an F6F Hellcat and an F8F Bearcat over the Salton Sea (The Hellcat and Bearcat were the first two aircraft models used by The Blue Angels after their beginning in 1946)—U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Ian Cotter

National War Museum of Scotland

15 March 2017

55° 56′ 57″ N / 3° 12′ 06″ W

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The National War Museum of Scotland has the air screw from the Sopwith Baby seaplane flown by Flight Lt. Ronald Graham of the Royal Naval Air Service to shoot down a German seaplane (note the self-inflicted bullet holes due to lack of an interruption mechanism)—Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

The National War Museum of Scotland is a multiple threat institutions since visitors also explore Edinburgh Castle as well as other museums (including one with Scotland’s Crown Jewels and the Stone of Destiny.

The National War Museum of Scotland is charming and quaint as well as being a world class facility. Artifacts from on as well as off the battlefield are displayed with art and grace but it is the large paintings which set this museum apart. It’s not that large painting, even murals, cannot be seen in other museum of course—it’s that visitors can stand so near them, near enough to see each brush stroke. It is breathtaking to observe the minute detail in these artworks, the combat illustration of the day, as well as where the artists purposefully obscured detail for effect. Individual facial expressions, odd body posturing, smoke, confusion and emotion are all there to see and get a thing of vicarious experience.

The largest artifact is a field cannon so most artifacts are light weapons, medals and the like—along with a fantastic amount of art. Many of the objects are hundreds of years in age but look absolutely pristine and amazingly so.

Entry is free and children are welcomed with most displays at their sighting level. An immensely enjoyable café is nearby that has a gorgeous vista of Edinburgh as well as the 105mm howitzer used at the 1pm signaling so that ship captains may set their chronometers.

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The painting entitled Short Stirlings: The Return of MacRobert’s Reply by Colin Cundall in 1941 at the National War Museum of Scotland—Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

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Short Stirlings: The Return of MacRobert’s Reply detail by Colin Cundall National War Museum of Scotland (the MacRobert clan lost two sons while serving in Bomber Command of the RAF during WW II)—Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

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7.62mm calibre machine gun recovered from a shot down He 111 bomber in the National War Museum of Scotland—Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

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A compass and cigarette tin recovered from shot down he 111 bombers as well as a gun site from a downed Luftwaffe Bf 109 fighter at the National War Museum of Scotland—Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

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National War Museum of Scotland—Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

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National War Museum of Scotland—Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

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Only a few of the India pattern muskets provided by Sir James Grant in 1794 and displayed beautifully in the National War Museum of Scotland—Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

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A variety of muzzle loading black powder pistols in the National War Museum of Scotland—Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

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A brace of muzzle loading pistols in a custom kit as exhibited in the National War Museum of Scotland—Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

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A cap and ball pistol kit displayed in the National War Museum of Scotland—Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

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Closing of the Gates at Hougoumont by artist Robert Gibbs in 1903 displayed at the National War Museum of Scotland—Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

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Closing of the Gates at Hougoumont by artist Robert Gibbs detail at the National War Museum of Scotland—Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

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Closing of the Gates at Hougoumont by artist Robert Gibbs detail in the National War Museum of Scotland—Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Closing of the Gates at Hougoumont by Scotland’s Robert Gibb shows the closely run moment during the Battle of Waterloo in 1815 when British soldiers rushed to close the gates at the fortified farmhouse occupying a key position protecting Wellington’s right flank and was the first action at Waterloo.

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Storming of Tel-el Kebir by the painter Alphonse Marie de Neuville on exhibit in the National War Museum of Scotland—Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

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Storming of Tel-el Kebir by the painter Alphonse Marie de Neuville detail in the National War Museum of Scotland—Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

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Storming of Tel-el Kebir by the painter Alphonse Marie de Neuville detail in the National War Museum of Scotland—Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Storming of Tel-el Kebir by Alphonse Marie de Neuville showing the decisive moment when, after a night march, the British forces stormed the Egyptian defenses in 1882. The artist studied the faces of many of the soldiers after the battle so that their faces would be accurately portrayed in this painting.

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The Battle of Camperdown by painter William Adolphus Knell illustrates the naval action between the British and Dutch navies in 1797 where the Royal Navy was overwhelmingly victorious and is in the National War Museum of Scotland—Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

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The Battle of Camperdown by painter William Adolphus Knell detail in the National War Museum of Scotland showing sailors abandoning their sinking vessel—Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

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The Battle of Camperdown by painter William Adolphus Knell detail in the National War Museum of Scotland showing one of the wrecked Dutch ships—Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

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The Thin Red Line by artist Robert Gibb illustrating the 1854 Crimean War action between the British forces and the Russian forces. Though the Russian cavalry approached only to with a hundred yards or so the artists made them closer so the individual figures could be recognizable. What became known as “The Thin Red Line” was formed of only two ranks (multiple ranks were required to maintain a volume of fire) to cover the breadth the high ground and so few soldiers indicated to the Russians that a larger force must have been reserved. The point became moot when the Russians withdrew to meet the charge of the Light Brigade at Balaclava. This painting is in the galleries of the National War Museum of Scotland—Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

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The Thin Red Line by artist Robert Gibb detail of the Russian cavalry forces in the National War Museum of Scotland—Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

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The Thin Red Line by artist Robert Gibb detail in the National War Museum of Scotland—Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft