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A Huey still in Vietnam

12 July 2013

A Huey still in Vietnam

21º 01′ 58″ N / 105º 50′ 24″ E

blog Huey WP_000436

UH-1 Iroquois “Huey” in the courtyard of the Vietnam Military History Museum in Hanoi — photo by Catherine Dowman ©2013

Some may argue the Huey is not the iconic symbol of the Vietnam War but they would be hard pressed to do so successfully. One of the Bell UH-1 Iroquois (nicknamed “Huey”) helicopters is exhibited on the grounds of the Vietnam Military History Museum (Bảo tàng Lịch sử Quân sự Việt Nam) in Hanoi. It has U.S. Air Force markings but may be a U.S. Army aircraft since the U.S. Air Force primarily used the twin engine models. Regardless, the livery seems accurate and if you’ll note this Huey is not taking up the space a helicopter usually does since the twin blades are oriented along the fuselage with no blades oriented out to the sides. The two blades rotor design was used for this very characteristic, easier storage, though less efficient aerodynamically. The two bladed rotor also helped to give Hueys their signature sound.

UH-1 Iroquois "Huey" in the courtyard of the Vietnam Military History Museum in Hanoi, a view familiar to many an infantryman — photo by Catherine Dowman ©2013

UH-1 Iroquois “Huey” in the courtyard of the Vietnam Military History Museum in Hanoi, a view familiar to many an infantryman serving in the Vietnam War — photo by Catherine Dowman ©2013

If the lighting looks bright, that is because it was on that 104º F (40º C) hot day when Catherine Dowman captured these images for use in this blog 🙂

UH-1 Iroquois "Huey" in the courtyard of the Vietnam Military History Museum in Hanoi (Hueys just don't look right with the cabin doors shut, do they?) — photo by Catherine Dowman ©2013

UH-1 Iroquois “Huey” in the courtyard of the Vietnam Military History Museum in Hanoi (Hueys just don’t look right with the cabin doors shut, do they?) — photo by Catherine Dowman ©2013

Use the search window with Vietnam Military History Museum for posts about the museum as well as other aircraft on exhibit their.

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2 Comments leave one →
  1. Fred Olds permalink
    12 July 2013 08:54

    Perfect depiction for a USAF Huey. When the USAF took over the Caribou fleet they always flew with the doors CLOSED so why be different for a Huey? Capt Fred Olds, USN, Ret LT CAN THO as senior NILO 66-67

    • travelforaircraft permalink*
      13 July 2013 09:56

      I believe you and my dad taught me better than to argue with a captain 😉 I’m an Army brat so I’m accustomed to seeing the interior of a Huey more often than not 🙂

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