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Armstrong Whitworth Argosy

27 November 2013

Armstrong Whitworth Argosy

Armstrong Whitworth AW.660 Argosy in flight — photo from the San Diego Air and Space Museum archive

G-EBLF “City of Glasgow” the first Imperial Airways Armstrong Whitworth Argosy in flight — photo from the San Diego Air and Space Museum archive

A design of the late 1920s at the direction of Imperial Airways the Argosy was built to be powered by three engines for greater reliability — beginning a trend built upon by Fokker, Ford and Stinson. Flying from 1926 through 1935 the Argosies flew European circuits as well as routes connecting Europe to the Middle and Near East for Imperial Airways — carrying as many as 20 passengers as far as 405 miles (652km) in an enclosed cabin, though the pilots were exposed in an open cockpit in an upper flight deck. Argosies were en evolutionary step in luxury passenger travel as well as reliable air mail service (a service more secure than many land routes).

Armstrong Whitworth AW.660 Argosy on the ground — photo from the San Diego Air and Space Museum archive

Armstrong Whitworth Argosy on the ground (note the people, especially the man on the ladder, for scale purposes) — photo from the San Diego Air and Space Museum archive

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2 Comments leave one →
  1. 2 December 2013 10:39

    Joseph:

    That was a surprise. I was expecting a piece on the early 1960’s 4-engined turbo-prop freighter of the same name. It was powered by Rolls-Royce turbo-props and had a twin-boom tail section, resulting in the nickname “The whistling wheelbarrow”.

  2. Sabina permalink
    11 December 2013 08:17

    A fighteraircraft is a forces aircraft designed primarily designed for air-to-air combat opposed to other aircraft,[1] having the status of conflicting to bombers and attack aircraft, whose key mission is to attack ground targets. The hallmarks of a fighter are its hurry, maneuverability, and insignificant size next of kin to other combat aircraft.

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