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Canadair CL 41G Tebuan — Tudor with a bite

16 December 2013

Canadair CL 41G Tebuan — Tudor with a bite

03° 07′ 04″ N / 101° 42′ 12″ E

Canadair CL 41G Tebuan — photo by Joseph May

Canadair CL 41G Tebuan and the Royal Malaysian Air Force Memorial — photo by Joseph May

Canadair’s CT-114 Tutor, famous for use by the Royal Canadian Air Force Snowbirds aerobatic team, was militarized for the Royal Malaysian Air Force (RMAF) as a ground attack aircraft. This aircraft was the CL 41G Tebuan (Tebuan is Malay for “Storm”) with nearly two dozen manufactured. The RMAF displays a Tebuan in an elegant elevated display as the centerpiece to its fallen aviators. Not a simple plane-on-a-stick construction — instead an artful structure supports this Tebuan in a flight position with names of those lost etched into a brass plaque with the small triangular surrounded by a brick wall. This memorial is located in Kuala Lumpur at the entrance of the Royal Malaysian Air Force Museum (which was reviewed in one of last week’s post).

Canadair CL 41G Tebuan — photo by Joseph May

Canadair CL 41G Tebuan with young women students reading those named on the brass plaque — photo by Joseph May

The honor roll at the memorial to the aviators lost in service to the Royal Malaysian Air Force — photo by Joseph May

The honor roll at the memorial to the aviators lost in service to the Royal Malaysian Air Force — photo by Joseph May

Canadair CL 41G Tebuan — photo by Joseph May

Canadair CL 41G Tebuan, note the RMAF symbol as well as the speed (air) brake located on the fuselage — photo by Joseph May

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4 Comments leave one →
  1. 16 December 2013 06:39

    Again, I agree with you totally! Its first-class. The designers of the Oriental countries have incredible graphic sense…finessed..subtle…elegant and statements that are powerful …example..the graphic shape of the pylons match the graphics on the side at the rear of the fuselage. Also another detail I think is fantastic is the way the airplane is ‘cradled’ instead of the often used typically “speared” approach! Its definitely not a popsicle on a stick!! 🙂 Classy!

  2. 17 February 2015 05:08

    Correction, ‘Tebuan” is correctly translated as Hornet and ‘Taufan’ is translated as Typhoon / Big Storm.
    Nice blog! keep up the good work!

  3. 17 February 2015 05:09

    p.s.’ Ribut’ is translated as storm.
    🙂

    • travelforaircraft permalink*
      20 February 2015 19:18

      Thanks so much 🙂

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