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de Havilland Dove — England’s first post WW II airliner design

27 January 2014

de Havilland Dove — England’s first post WW II airliner design

03° 07′ 00″ N /  101° 42′ 13″ E

de Havilland Dove — photo by Joseph May

de Havilland Dove retired from the Royal Malaysian Air Force and on display at their museum in Kuala Lumpur was used for VIP transport and liaison missions — photo by Joseph May

De Havilland’s Dove was produced shortly after WW II’s end in order to fulfill a need for a feeder airliner and it was quite successful with almost 550 produced — split 4 civilian for 1 military (Devons and Sea Devons) — and flown in many countries around the world. Aerodynamically clean with twin engines, and able to carry 8–11 passengers for 880 miles (~1400km) economically, Doves served their owners well.

de Havilland Dove — photo by Joseph May

de Havilland Dove pilots had generous headroom — photo by Joseph May

de Havilland Dove — photo by Joseph May

de Havilland Doves were compact and efficient — photo by Joseph May

de Havilland Dove — photo by Joseph May

The right hand 6-cylinder in-line inverted air cooled Gypsy Queen engine which powered the de Havilland Doves — photo by Joseph May

de Havilland Dove — photo by Joseph May

Passenger seating in the de Havilland Dove was a row down each side of the fuselage with entry from the rear — photo by Joseph May

Note: the subsequent post will be about the de Havilland Heron, an obvious descendant!

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2 Comments leave one →
  1. 27 January 2014 11:17

    Its amazing how sleek the front view is..compact and aero as you wrote. Are they still being used commercially?,,or in hands of collectors? I’m hoping to find a photo of the interior..mainly to see the specific reason for the bulbous (exterior) cockpit area,,

    • travelforaircraft permalink*
      28 January 2014 21:32

      Hello. If you like the Dove then you will also like the Heron which goes up next. I can only guess but I think they are retired with a few in museums. A Google image search shows the interior not really made for American sized guys and I think the the cockpit bulges were to give pilots headroom.

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