Skip to content

Sea-Tac’s evolutionary Alexander Aircraft Eaglerock 1928

26 March 2014

Sea-Tac’s evolutionary Alexander Aircraft Eaglerock 1928

47° 26′ 25″ N / 122° 17′ 53″ W

 

Alexander Eaglerock Combo-Wing in the southern part of the Main Terminal — photo by Joseph May

Alexander Eaglerock Combo-Wing in the southern part of Sea-Tac’s Main Terminal — photo by Joseph May

The Eaglerock, made by the Alexander Aircraft Company, was a vast improvement and part of a wave of new designs replacing the surplus World War I aircraft. Streamlining, folding wings, more reliable engine (Curtiss OX-5 rated 90 hp) and available tailwheel (too novel for many aviators of the time). Restored by brothers Frank and Victor Hansen in honor their barnstorming father, Bernard, of the 1920s who retired after crashing during the Great Depression — Bernard Hansen survived but his Alexander Eaglerock did not. The Hansen brothers purchased this Eaglerock, which is suspended inside of the south atrium of the Main Terminal in the Seattle-Tacoma International Airport (Sea-Tac), in 1977 which began their restoration project with Bill Duncan. They completed their 1928 vintage Alexander Eaglerock Combo-Wing by 1998 and donated it to Seattle’s Museum of Flight which has it on loaned to Sea-Tac. Back in the day the aircraft was quite sporty in its blue and silver scheme carrying two persons as fast as 100 mph (160kph) and as far as 395 miles (632km).

Alexander Eaglerock Combo-Wing in the southern part of the Main Terminal — photo by Joseph May

Alexander Eaglerock Combo-Wing in the southern part of Sea-Tac’s Main Terminal — photo by Joseph May

Alexander Eaglerock Combo-Wing in the southern part of the Main Terminal — photo by Joseph May

The Alexander Eaglerock Combo-Wing was powered by a 90 hp Curtiss OX-5 V-8 liquid cooled engine — photo by Joseph May

Alexander Eaglerock Combo-Wing in the southern part of the Main Terminal — photo by Joseph May

Alexander Eaglerock Combo-Wing as it would appear when crossing the threshold, no flaps with ailerons on the upper as well as lower wings — photo by Joseph May

Alexander Eaglerock Combo-Wing in the southern part of the Main Terminal — photo by Joseph May

Alexander Eaglerock Combo-Wing has the upper wing well above the fuselage giving the pilot good visibility ahead — photo by Joseph May

 

Alexander Eaglerock Combo-Wing in the southern part of the Main Terminal — photo by Joseph May

Alexander Eaglerock Combo-Wing in the southern part of the Main Terminal — photo by Joseph May

Alexander Eaglerock Combo-Wing in the southern part of the Main Terminal — photo by Joseph May

The Alexander Eaglerock Combo-Wing’s blue positively responds to direct sunlight — photo by Joseph May

Alexander Eaglerock Combo-Wing in the southern part of the Main Terminal — photo by Joseph May

View of the Alexander Eaglerock Combo-Wing from the Main Terminal’s baggage level — photo by Joseph May

Advertisements
2 Comments leave one →
  1. 3 January 2015 21:14

    Thank you for your blog. My grandfather worked for Alexander Industries in 1927 and 1928, building these planes. I will have to make a trip to SeaTac to see it one day.dk

    • travelforaircraft permalink*
      4 January 2015 10:10

      My thanks to you. Occurrences like this are their own reward since the purpose of the blog is to show where aviation’s history can be seen, especially the unexpected corners. Even better when there is a personal connection I’m happy to say for you.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: