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Caught! B-29 in the open in tightie whities, oh my!

7 April 2014

Caught! B-29 in the open in tightie whities, oh my!

47° 31′ 10′ N / 122° 17′ 49″ W

 

Boeing B-29 Superfortress — photo by Joseph May

Boeing B-29 Superfortress in protective white plastic wrapping — photo by Joseph May

This Boeing B-29 Superfortress, known as T-Square 54, flew combat missions in World War II and then served as a KB-29 during the Korean War before use as a ground gunnery target. Restored level by level it is now on loan to the Museum of Flight from the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force and under protective wrapping (the outer wing panels are in a nearby warehouse) until a display facility can be built where it will stand with a Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress (a side-by-side comparison will show how far technology advanced in only a few years, though on a wartime footing).

Boeing B-29 Superfortress — photo by Joseph May

An impression of the Boeing B-29 Superfortress’s  right wing as well as Numbers 3 and 4 engines — photo by Joseph May

Boeing B-29 Superfortress — photo by Joseph May

Boeing B-29 Superfortress, this angle sans the outer wing panel better shows the contours of the engine nacelles — photo by Joseph May

Boeing B-29 Superfortress — photo by Joseph May

The Boeing B-29 Superfortress is marked by an impressive vertical stabilizer and rudder assembly — photo by Joseph May

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4 Comments leave one →
  1. 7 April 2014 10:47

    Talk about a surreal work of art! Any idea how they got it out there?..when did it leave Dayton?…any inside stories I can find somewhere? This is the first I’d heard about it. How exciting it is!!!!

    • travelforaircraft permalink*
      11 April 2014 10:06

      Hi David,

      I’m unsure about the transportation arrangements except that it didn’t fly on its own. The museum’s link http://www.museumofflight.org/aircraft/boeing-b-29-superfortress has a bit of info, but wikipedia has more en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_surviving_Boeing_B-29_Superfortresses, which is:

      “T-Square-54
      Serial number 44-69729 (No. 54) was assigned to the 875th Bomb Squadron, 498th Bomb Group, 73d Bomb Wing and completed 37 bombing missions before it was converted to a KB-29 aerial refueling tanker in June 1949. In 1986 it was removed from the Naval Air Weapons Station China Lake and transported to the Lowry Heritage Museum at Lowry Air Force Base;[9] now Wings Over the Rockies Air and Space Museum. No. 54 went through its initial level of restoration in 1987 with museum volunteers and was readied for Lowry AFB’s 50th anniversary and the 40th anniversary of the USAF on 2 October 1987. It was restored to its 1944 markings with the “T Square 54″ on its vertical stabilizer. In 1995 the USAF Museum transferred T-Sq-54 to the Museum of Flight in Seattle, Washington. After another level of restoration and change in its markings, it was displayed again 1996.”

  2. shortfinals permalink
    8 April 2014 22:45

    Now THAT is a ghostly Superfortress! Amazing…….thanks for this!

    • travelforaircraft permalink*
      11 April 2014 10:02

      We did get lucky with the low rolling white clouds and so much diffused light 🙂

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