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Lockheed Super Constellation walkaround — elegance in red stripes (Part II)

16 April 2014

Lockheed Super Constellation walkaround — elegance in red stripes (Part II)

47° 31′ 09″ N / 122° 18′ 00″ W

Lockheed Super Constellation — photo by Joseph May

Lockheed Super Constellation at the Museum of Flight — photo by Joseph May

The previous post, on Monday, introduced this beautiful Trans-Canadian Air Lines Lockheed 1049G Super Constellation at the Museum of Flight — and Friday’s post will have several more images. Please, enjoy 🙂

Lockheed Super Constellation — photo by Joseph May

Lockheed Super Constellation’s required tall gear struts for propeller clearance, a design challenge but also enhancing the Super Connie’s elegance — photo by Joseph May

Lockheed Super Constellation — photo by Joseph May

Lockheed Super Constellation was also a power brute with four Wright R-3350 Duplex-Cyclone twin row radial engines generating a combined 13,600 hp/10,140kW — photo by Joseph May

Lockheed Super Constellation — photo by Joseph May

Lockheed Super Constellation nose gear — photo by Joseph May

Lockheed Super Constellation — photo by Joseph May

Lockheed Super Constellation’s graceful as well as characteristic triple tail — photo by Joseph May

Lockheed Super Constellation — photo by Joseph May

Lockheed Super Constellation’s usually embarked and debarked passengers from the rear of the main cabin — photo by Joseph May

Lockheed Super Constellation — photo by Joseph May

Right fin of this Lockheed Super Constellation — photo by Joseph May

Next Friday will complete the photo essay of this wonderfully conserved Trans-Canada Air Lines Lockheed 1049G Super Constellation — and recall the previous Monday post’s information 🙂

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2 Comments leave one →
  1. 16 April 2014 04:31

    Do you suppose they have a special program to maintain the appearance of the aircraft sitting outside to offset the rigors of Seattle winters and summer heat?. It would see, to be
    that or the finesse’ of good photography!

    I wonder if they’ll end up with more of those craft inside structures?…the USAFM seems to have done it long term. I’ve never seen the Museum of Flight (sadly!)…but it looks tight for space…so that may not be the case..

    • travelforaircraft permalink*
      16 April 2014 15:27

      Hello David,

      The air park is tight for space but they do have six large aircraft there (Connie, 747, 737, 707-like aircraft, 737 and Concorde) — thankfully the Connie has a nice buffer space around it so I was able to use almost every angle. Use Google Earth and go to 47 31 10 N / 122 18 00 W (paste the phrase into the search window) and you will have a bird’s eye view of the air park. There you’ll see how large the 747 really is as it neighbors the Connie. As for maintenance, I wouldn’t know. I did see a large air conditioning unit underneath the Concorde, though. And, there are more than 120 other aircraft to see in the other galleries!

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