Skip to content

B-23 Dragon Walkaround — slow but a first, 1 of 2

11 August 2014

B-23 Dragon Walkaround — slow but a first, 1 of 2

47° 07′ 54″ N / 122° 28′ 57″ W

B-23 Dragon — photo by Joseph May

The colorful cowling art on this Douglas B-23 Dragon — photo by Joseph May

Douglas designed the B-23 Dragon as the successor to their B-18 Bolo (the search window will bring you to the walkaround as well as other posts). As a bomber it was a non contender as it was quickly eclipsed by other aircraft  — notably the North American B-25 Mitchell, Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress and Martin B-26 Marauder which were all quite a bit faster and carried weightier bomb loads.

The Dragon served during World War II at home in training, patrol as well as utility duties (as the UC-67). It has a niche in history, though, as the first combat aircraft with a tail gun position — a feature soon to become a standard with its contemporaries and successors. Dragon were powered by a pair of Wright R 2600-3 Cyclone reciprocating radial engines and defensively armed with a trio of 0.30 caliber machine guns as well as a single 0.50 caliber machine gun. Dragons could take up to 4000 pounds of bombs to the target at a leisurely cruising speed of 210 mph at altitudes up to 31,600 feet.

This Douglas B-23 Dragon is displayed in perfect condition on Heritage Hill Air Park which is part of the McChord Air Museum. Further detail of this particular aircraft can be found in this fact page with further information and photos of the aircraft type in the fact page of the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force.

B-23 Dragon — photo by Joseph May

The Douglas B-23 Dragon at the McChord Air Museum & Heritage Hill Air Park — photo by Joseph May

B-23 Dragon — photo by Joseph May

Douglas B-23 Dragon — photo by Joseph May

B-23 Dragon — photo by Joseph May

Douglas B-23 Dragon — photo by Joseph May

B-23 Dragon — photo by Joseph May

Douglas B-23 Dragon — photo by Joseph May

B-23 Dragon — photo by Joseph May

Douglas B-23 Dragon — photo by Joseph May

B-23 Dragon — photo by Joseph May

Left main gear of the B-23 Dragon — photo by Joseph May

B-23 Dragon — photo by Joseph May

Douglas B-23 Dragon — photo by Joseph May

Next Wednesday — more photos 🙂

Advertisements
2 Comments leave one →
  1. 11 August 2014 09:30

    Wow!….Their aircraft sure seem to appear to be beautifully restored and fresh!

  2. Bruce Kay permalink
    11 August 2014 20:10

    Ah. . . before counter rotating props.

    Sent from my iPhone

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: