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Walking around the Vulcan

17 September 2014

Walking around the Vulcan

37° 21′ 55″ N / 120° 34′ 46″ W

[Editor’s note: this is the third of four posts this week concerning the Avro Vulcan. The Vulcan is not well known on the west side of the Atlantic Ocean but is more than famous on the east side of the Atlantic as the Royal Air Force’s primary nuclear strike strategic bomber during most of the Cold War. As with its NATO cousin, the Boeing B-52 Stratofortress, it too originally flew missions high and fast until increasingly capable fighter and missile threats demanded a change in tactics. Like the B-52, the Vulcan’s airframe was then reinforced for low penetration flying—also changing the livery from anti-flash white to earth toned camouflage coloring.]

Avro Vulcan — photo by Joseph May

Avro Vulcan at the Castle Air Museum — photo by Joseph May

Avro Vulcan — photo by Joseph May

The Avro Vulcan has a powerful presence on the ground as well as in the air — photo by Joseph May

Avro Vulcan — photo by Joseph May

The Avro Vulcan’s aerodynamics were paradigm setting during the 1950s — photo by Joseph May

Avro Vulcan — photo by Joseph May

Avro Vulcan in profile  — photo by Joseph May

Avro Vulcan — photo by Joseph May

The Avro Vulcan cockpit was designed for anti-flash protection during a nuclear strike and certainly not for flight crew visibility — photo by Joseph May

Avro Vulcan — photo by Joseph May

The small round window aft of the Avro Vulcan’s cockpit blister admitted light to the crew sitting below and aft of the pilots, the ventral bulge is the bomb aimer’s station — photo by Joseph May

Avro Vulcan — photo by Joseph May

The bomb aimer’s position in Avro Vulcan was useful only for medium and low altitude bombing — photo by Joseph May

Avro Vulcan — photo by Joseph May

The right-side engine air inlet for a pair of the Avro Vulcan’s engines — photo by Joseph May

Avro Vulcan — photo by Joseph May

View down the Avro Vulcan’s ventral side — photo by Joseph May

Avro Vulcan — photo by Joseph May

The Avro Vulcan’s left main gear — photo by Joseph May

Avro Vulcan — photo by Joseph May

The Avro Vulcan’s tail, the bulge on the upper tail cone surface house the braking parachute — photo by Joseph May

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4 Comments leave one →
  1. Bruce Kay permalink
    17 September 2014 16:39

    Joe:

    Great Interview and photos. You spent some time on this. I was very impressed by this Limy creation. I didn’t know much about it. Now I do, thanks.

    • travelforaircraft permalink*
      17 September 2014 21:48

      Heh, thanks 🙂

      I didn’t know much about the Vulcan except for its appearance in Thunderball but got introduced to Bill Ramsey who is more than generous with his time and flies the Vulcan today — so we all got lucky 😉

  2. S.S. McDonald permalink
    17 September 2014 17:25

    Two facts about the Avro Vulcan. 1, NEVER stand near the intakes, and 2 NEVER go near one without massive ear protection

    • travelforaircraft permalink*
      17 September 2014 21:49

      Sounds like excellent advice!

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