Skip to content

The Montgolfière Brothers Balloon — first ascending flight by man

5 August 2015
Montgolfière Balloon — photo by Joseph May

The Montgolfière Balloon, which was the acme of aviation in its day — photo by Joseph May

This model of the balloon (globe aérostatique) constructed by Joseph Michael and JacquesÉtienne Montgolfière is wonderfully large enough so details can be easily seen. The eloborate decorations honoring the sponsors as well as France’s king are nearly unheard of today. The original balloon had a volumous 60,000 cubic foot (1700 cubic meter) envelope comprised of taffeta fabric coated with a veneer of alum for fireproofing — which stood 75 feet (22.7m) in height.

Montgolfière Balloon — photo by Joseph May

Montgolfière Balloon with close-up of the pilot for scale — photo by Joseph May

This was state-of-the-art aviation in the late 1700s (first flights in 1983) and this model is suspended near the entry of Seattle’s Museum of Flight.

Montgolfière Balloon — photo by Joseph May

The Montgolfière Balloon had decorations denoting support by wallpaper manufacture Jen Baptiste Réveillon and emblem of Louis XVI (then king of France) — photo by Joseph May

Advertisements
2 Comments leave one →
  1. Bruce Kay permalink
    5 August 2015 05:50

    Joe:
    Of., course an engineering question. . . is this a hot air balloon? How do they heat the air?
    Bruce

    • travelforaircraft permalink*
      5 August 2015 09:09

      Engineering is how the design gets off the paper 😉 It was definitely a hot air balloon. I think your answer lies in the collar design of the balloon’s basket — it seems the craft didn’t carry a heat source with it meaning the collar surrounded the fire on the ground which heated the air that went into the envelope.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: