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Sabre Dog on the lawn at McChord — walkaround 2 of 2

12 August 2015

47° 07′ 53″ N / 122° 28′ 58″ W

North American F-86D Sabre at McChord Air Museum & Heritage Hill Air Park — photo by Joseph May

North American F-86D Sabre at McChord Air Museum & Heritage Hill Air Park — photo by Joseph May

North American F-86D Sabre at McChord Air Museum & Heritage Hill Air Park — photo by Joseph May

North American F-86D Sabre at McChord Air Museum & Heritage Hill Air Park — photo by Joseph May

North American F-86D Sabre at McChord Air Museum & Heritage Hill Air Park — photo by Joseph May

North American F-86D Sabre at McChord Air Museum & Heritage Hill Air Park — photo by Joseph May

North American F-86D Sabre at McChord Air Museum & Heritage Hill Air Park — photo by Joseph May

North American F-86D Sabre at McChord Air Museum & Heritage Hill Air Park — photo by Joseph May

North American F-86D Sabre at McChord Air Museum & Heritage Hill Air Park — photo by Joseph May

North American F-86D Sabre at McChord Air Museum & Heritage Hill Air Park — photo by Joseph May

North American F-86D Sabre at McChord Air Museum & Heritage Hill Air Park — photo by Joseph May

North American F-86D Sabre at McChord Air Museum & Heritage Hill Air Park — photo by Joseph May

 

 

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9 Comments leave one →
  1. Douglas Hasert permalink
    12 August 2015 09:50

    I worked on the F86D as an Acft Electrician in 1958-59 at Erding Germany and Wheelus Libya, 440 FIS and Det.1 86FIW.

    • travelforaircraft permalink*
      12 August 2015 11:07

      So…you know all the secrets, then 😉

      • Douglas Hasert permalink
        12 August 2015 11:37

        No longer secret, it’s an antique and so I guess I am too .. 😦

      • travelforaircraft permalink*
        15 August 2015 07:38

        Same here but glad they don’t have us sitting out on the lawn ,)

  2. 13 August 2015 13:31

    That time when it was decided a gun was no longer required…

    • travelforaircraft permalink*
      15 August 2015 08:19

      It must have been a sight when launching all the rockets.

      • 19 August 2015 15:31

        Quite the view from the cockpit too!

  3. shortfinals permalink
    23 August 2015 22:17

    The British Sea Vixen FAW 1 carried 2 x 14 Microcell packs each containing 14 x 2 inch rockets, for attacking large aircraft. These were deployed either side of the nosegear bay. The later FAW.2 did NOT have these!

    • travelforaircraft permalink*
      24 August 2015 09:38

      Ross, again–thanks so much 🙂 That query has been put to rest!

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