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V-22 Osprey walkaround — first half

31 August 2015

39° 59′ 30″ N / 75° 34′ 43″ W

Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey at the American Helicopter Museum — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey at the American Helicopter Museum — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Osprey — Bell Boeing’s aircraft which is the first tiltrotor entering production. Currently flown in the USAF as the CV-22 and the USMC as the MV-22 it is gaining a reputation for long range medivac and transport well beyond helicopter ranges as well as with greater speed.

Only two Ospreys are on public display and this one is the third of six V-22 Osprey prototypes which is located at the American Helicopter Museum. Transition from conventional to vertical flight is done by rotating the engine/proprotor combination at each wingtip. Rotation angles are 97.5º, allowing for reverse flight when needed. The proprotor is lightweight and each can engine drive both proprotors to prevent crashing should an engine be lost — though the low weight of the composite material proprotor design has the Osprey suffering when under autorotation (though it has a glide ration of 4.5:1). The propwash is extremely powerful and such that a minimal vertical separation of 25 feet between Ospreys in flight is mandatory as is not using the starboard fuselage door for paratrooper delivery (the rear ramp is instead used).

Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey at the American Helicopter Museum — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey at the American Helicopter Museum with stairs to view into the cockpit — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey at the American Helicopter Museum — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey at the American Helicopter Museum has the tiltrotors partly tilted (one can see how the powerful and heated exhaust could affect certain runway surfaces and flight decks) — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey at the American Helicopter Museum — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey at the American Helicopter Museum view of the twin tail — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey at the American Helicopter Museum — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey at the American Helicopter Museum aft ramp making it a versatile in regard to cargo as well as troops — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey at the American Helicopter Museum — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey at the American Helicopter Museum starboard side view and note the full deflection of the wing flap — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey at the American Helicopter Museum — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey at the American Helicopter Museum port side view (note the sponson houses the main landing gear allowing for maximum usable volume in the cargo bay — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Exhaust heat from  each  6150 hp turboshaft engine is massive and, like the F-35B Lightning II, requires improved flight decks for naval operations afloat. Less obvious advanced features are an airframe of 43% composite materials, folding proprotor blades and the wing pivoting 90º for stowage aboard ship.

Each Osprey is crewed by two pilots and two crew chiefs and typically carries 24 troops or 20,000 pounds internally/15,000 pounds externally. Range can be as far as 1011 miles at a cruising speed of 277 mph – with a get out-of-Dodge speed of 316 mph.

Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey at the American Helicopter Museum — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey at the American Helicopter Museum view of the starboard wing — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey at the American Helicopter Museum — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey at the American Helicopter Museum profile view — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey at the American Helicopter Museum — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey at the American Helicopter Museum starboard tiltrotor and proprotor — Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

This Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey is displayed on the grounds of the American Helicopter Museum and the next post will finalize this walkaround 🙂

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2 Comments leave one →
  1. 31 August 2015 11:44

    Amazing machine technologically ….I’ve often wondered about the “sitting duck” aspect in military operation…machine guns fired at large blades, etc.

    Ah, ha!…ALLISON engines..believe, though not positive i they are made here in Indianapolis, but the name is certainly a famous and favored one here; in that Mr. Allison was one of the four founders of the Indianapolis 500. Also, Allison has an absolutely terrific historical aviation (and vehicle transportation) engine museum at their facility on the South side of the city.
    best,
    david

    • travelforaircraft permalink*
      3 September 2015 12:04

      Thanks Dave — I didn’t know of Allison’s museum 🙂

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