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Alexia Aermacchi HC-27 Spartan—new aircraft type for the USCG

11 April 2016

 

A C-27J Medium Range Surveillance airplane sits on the runway at Coast Guard Aviation Logistics Center in Elizabeth City, North Carolina, Thursday, March 31, 2016. The C-27J is the newest Coast Guard aircraft to join the fleet and will be used in maritime patrol, drug and migrant interdiction, disaster response, and search and rescue missions. U.S. Coast Guard photograph by Petty Officer 3rd Class Joshua L. Canup

An Alexia Aermacchi HC-27J Spartan—U.S. Coast Guard photograph by Petty Officer 3rd Class Joshua L. Canup

The U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) recently acquired 14 Spartans from the U.S. Air Force primarily for medium range surveillance missions. Obviously, these aircraft can be utilized for most of the USCG spectrum of duties—also including patrol, supply search and rescue, as well as interdiction. Spartans were originally designed and built for NATO by Alexia Aermacchi with assistance by Lockheed so it is of small surprise that the cockpit layout, engines and propellers are the same as the C-130 Hercules. The HC-27J is 74′-6″ in length, possesses a 94′-2″ wingspan with a cruising airspeed of 290 knots. As a surveillance aircraft its most attractive qualities, perhaps, is its 12 hour endurance and range of 2675 nautical miles.

A C-27J Medium Range Surveillance airplane sits on the runway at Coast Guard Aviation Logistics Center in Elizabeth City, North Carolina, Thursday, March 31, 2016. The C-27J is the newest Coast Guard aircraft to join the fleet and will be used in maritime patrol, drug and migrant interdiction, disaster response, and search and rescue missions. U.S. Coast Guard photograph by Petty Officer 3rd Class Joshua L. Canup

An Alexia Aermacchi HC-27J Spartan—U.S. Coast Guard photograph by Petty Officer 3rd Class Joshua L. Canup

Alexia Aermacchi HC-27J Spartan—USCG photo by Alexia Aermacchi HC-27J Spartan Medium Range Surveillance airplane sits on the runway at Coast Guard Aviation Logistics Center in Elizabeth City, North Carolina, Thursday, March 31, 2016. The C-27J U.S. Coast Guard photograph by Petty Officer 3rd Class Joshua L. Canup

An Alexia Aermacchi HC-27J Spartan—U.S. Coast Guard photograph by Petty Officer 3rd Class Joshua L. Canup

A C-27J Medium Range Surveillance airplane sits on the runway at Coast Guard Aviation Logistics Center in Elizabeth City, North Carolina, Thursday, March 31, 2016. The C-27J is the newest Coast Guard aircraft to join the fleet and will be used in maritime patrol, drug and migrant interdiction, disaster response, and search and rescue missions. U.S. Coast Guard photograph by Petty Officer 3rd Class Joshua L. Canup

An Alexia Aermacchi HC-27J Spartan—U.S. Coast Guard photograph by Petty Officer 3rd Class Joshua L. Canup

A C-27J Medium Range Surveillance airplane sits on the runway at Coast Guard Aviation Logistics Center in Elizabeth City, North Carolina, Thursday, March 31, 2016. The C-27J is the newest Coast Guard aircraft to join the fleet and will be used in maritime patrol, drug and migrant interdiction, disaster response, and search and rescue missions. U.S. Coast Guard photograph by Petty Officer 3rd Class Joshua L. Canup

An Alexia Aermacchi HC-27J Spartan—U.S. Coast Guard photograph by Petty Officer 3rd Class Joshua L. Canup

A C-27J Medium Range Surveillance airplane sits on the runway at Coast Guard Aviation Logistics Center in Elizabeth City, North Carolina, Thursday, March 31, 2016. The C-27J is the newest Coast Guard aircraft to join the fleet and will be used in maritime patrol, drug and migrant interdiction, disaster response, and search and rescue missions. U.S. Coast Guard photograph by Petty Officer 3rd Class Joshua L. Canup

An Alexia Aermacchi HC-27J Spartan—U.S. Coast Guard photograph by Petty Officer 3rd Class Joshua L. Canup

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4 Comments leave one →
  1. 11 April 2016 01:11

    Looks very smart in coast guard livery

    • travelforaircraft permalink*
      11 April 2016 21:43

      The white with orange does look sharp, I agree.

  2. 11 April 2016 01:24

    Coastie family here. Semper Paratus, mate. Forwarded to my son who spent many hours patrolling Lake Gitche Gumee (Chippewa: Gichigam) in an HU-16 Albatross. The Albatross is a Very Large Noise encased in a metal structure. I am sure the local residents will not complain as much when one of these takes off at combat power for an SAR mission at 3:00 AM.

    There are no noise abatement procedures when launching an emergency SAR. Combat power until cruising altitude is reached.

    • travelforaircraft permalink*
      11 April 2016 21:42

      Love that description 🙂

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