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Russia’s Helix Helo

23 May 2016
050607-N-0000L-001 A Russian KA-27 helicopter assigned to the Russian destroyer RFS Natoychiviy (DD 610) lands aboard the British frigate HMS Sutherland (F 81) during Baltic Operations (BALTOPS) 2005. This year's international exercise, co-hosted by Latvia and the United States, includes 11 nations, 4,100 people, 40 ships, 28 aircraft and two submarines in the spirit of "Partnership for Peace (PFP)." BALTOPS 2005 improves interoperability with allies and PFP countries by conducting peace support operations at sea to include a combined amphibious landing and a scenario dealing with potential real world crisis. Royal Navy photo by Lt. Cmdr. Keith Lincoln (RELEASED)

A Russian Ka 27 (NATO identifier “Helix”)) helicopter assigned to the Russian destroyer RFS Natoychiviy (DD 610) lands aboard the British frigate HMS Sutherland (F 81) during Baltic Operations (BALTOPS) 2005—Royal Navy photo by Lt. Cmdr. Keith Lincoln

050607-N-0000L-002 A Russian KA-27 helicopter assigned to the Russian destroyer RFS Natoychiviy (DD 610) takes off from the British frigate HMS Sutherland (F 81) during Baltic Operations (BALTOPS) 2005. This year's international exercise, co-hosted by Latvia and the United States, includes 11 nations, 4,100 people, 40 ships, 28 aircraft and two submarines in the spirit of "Partnership for Peace (PFP)." BALTOPS 2005 improves interoperability with allies and PFP countries by conducting peace support operations at sea to include a combined amphibious landing and a scenario dealing with potential real world crisis. Royal Navy photo by Lt. Cmdr. Keith Lincoln (RELEASED)

A Russian Ka 27 (NATO identifier “Helix”) helicopter assigned to the Russian destroyer RFS Natoychiviy (DD 610) takes off from the British frigate HMS Sutherland (F 81) during Baltic Operations (BALTOPS) 2005—Royal Navy photo by Lt. Cmdr. Keith Lincoln

100722-N-1098L-030 English Channel (July 22, 2010) Military Sealift Fleet Support Command (MSC) civil service mariner Boatswain’s Mate Anthony Brooks, a landing signal enlisted flight crewmen, directs a Kamov (KA 26) Helix Soviet navy helicopter for takeoff aboard the amphibious command ship USS Mount Whitney (LCC/JCC 20) as part of an international partnership training during FRUKUS 2010. FRUKUS is an annual naval exercise involving the maritime forces of France, Russia, the United Kingdom and the United States, developed to formulate joint activities within a multi-national operational formation while improving interoperability between the nations. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Warrant Officer Jeffrey Lund/Released)

A Kamov Ka 27 (NATO identifier ” Helix”) Soviet navy helicopter for taking off from the amphibious command ship USS Mount Whitney (LCC/JCC 20)—U.S. Navy photo by Chief Warrant Officer Jeffrey Lund

160412-N-ZZ999-003 BALTIC SEA (April 12, 2016) A Russian Kamov KA-27 HELIX helicopter flies low-level passes near the Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyer USS Donald Cook (DDG 75) while the ship was operating in international waters April 12, 2016. Donald Cook is forward deployed to Rota, Spain, and is conducting routine patrols in the U.S. 6th Fleet area of operations in support of U.S. national security interests in Europe.  (U.S. Navy photo/Released)

A Russian Kamov KA-27 HELIX helicopter flies low-level passes near the Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyer USS Donald Cook (DDG 75)—U.S. Navy photo

 

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4 Comments leave one →
  1. Nick permalink
    23 May 2016 01:54

    Any vehicle that flies must be good looking, however, that is not true in this case. I realize these Kamov helicopters have been around forever, so they must fly, but they’re ugly. And you know what “they” say about ’em: “Helicopters don’t fly; they’re so ugly the earth repulses them!” That’s how I really feel…

  2. 23 May 2016 01:55

    During friendlier times…

    • travelforaircraft permalink*
      23 May 2016 16:41

      How rapidly times change 😦

  3. 23 May 2016 08:07

    Agree with Nick. That is one ugly machine.

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