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USCG helos in operation

25 July 2016
An MH-65 Dolphin helicopter conducts vertical replenishment training aboard the Coast Guard Cutter Active, March 12, 2015. The Active is on a counter narcotic deployment in the Pacific Ocean. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Ryan Tippets)

An MH-65 Dolphin helicopter hovers while delivering supplies aboard a cutter—U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Ryan Tippets

A helicopter crew from Coast Guard Air Station Elizabeth City, N.C., conducts a search and rescue demonstration Thursday, Oct. 22, 2015, on the Elizabeth River near Norfolk, Va. The demonstration was a part of the 16th Annual Towing Vessel Safety Seminar put on by the Coast Guard and Virginia Maritime Association. (U.S. Coast Guard photograph by Coast Guard Auxiliarist Trey Clifton)

USCG Jayhawk crew demonstrating search and rescue on the Elizabeth River near Norfolk, VA—U.S. Coast Guard photograph by Coast Guard Auxiliarist Trey Clifton

An MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter crew returns to Air Station Kodiak, Alaska, to transfer a patient to emergency medical personnel after hoisting him from a cruise ship July 22, 2015. The 83-year-old man was suffering from symptoms of a heart attack aboard a Holland America cruise ship requiring a medevac for immediate medical attention. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Lauren Steenson)

An MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter crew returning to Air Station Kodiak in Alaska with a patient after hoisting him from a cruise ship on 22 July 22 2015—U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Lauren Steenson

A rescue swimmer hangs below an MH-60 Medium Range Recovery Helicopter Friday, Feb. 26, 2016, during a search and rescue demonstration near Elizabeth City, N.C. U.S. Coast Guard helicopters were painted the retro color scheme to celebrate the Coast Guard's aviation centennial birthday. (U.S. Coast Guard photograph by Lt. Cmdr. Krystyn Pecora)

A rescue swimmer hanging below an MH-60 Jayhawk in a search and rescue demonstration on 26 Feb 2016 (this helo is painted in a retro color scheme to celebrate the Coast Guard’s aviation centennial birthday)—U.S. Coast Guard photograph by Lt. Cmdr. Krystyn Pecora

A Coast Guard Air Station Kodiak MH-60 Jayhawk crew conducts a helicopter in-flight refuel evolution with the crew of the Cutter Healy southwest of Kodiak Island, Alaska, July 3, 2015. The HIFR technique allows for Coast Guard helicopter crews to safely refuel from a cutter and extend their search and rescue area, a critical component due to the expansive 44,000 miles of coast that surrounds Alaska. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Kelly Parker)

An MH-60 Jayhawk crew refuels while in-flight from the USCG Cutter Healy southwest of Kodiak Island AK—U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Kelly Parker

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5 Comments leave one →
  1. 25 July 2016 08:43

    The pilots and crew on those aircraft are amazing. Way back in my day each of our aircrews participated in air sea rescue training drills with chopper squadrons based at NAS JAX. Each of us would be dropped into the water from the helicopter and when they came back to pick us up the pilots were so precise they could hover that thing so close to the water you could almost reach up and touch the skid. They could hold that attitude for as long as it took their crew to hoist us up and into the aircraft. .

    • travelforaircraft permalink*
      30 July 2016 06:56

      I second! On a swimming rescue a USCG helo came over us in a hover just a foot off the water so I could talk to the crew chief for a minute or so. Absolutely amazing.

  2. 1 August 2016 01:20

    Both my sons were USCG. Semper Paratus!

    Be sure to see the movie, “Their Finest Hours.” Based on a true rescue story in 1950.

    • travelforaircraft permalink*
      2 August 2016 21:59

      Thanks for the tip and happy for you 🙂

  3. 16 August 2016 17:27

    Reblogged this on basheerabdulwahab.

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