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MEA (Multi-role Enforcement Aircraft) Beechcraft Super King Air 350 ER

10 August 2016

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) has a new aircraft which will replace the many types currently in service—the Beechcraft Super King Air C-12C/M & B-200, and the Piper PA-42 Cheyenne. Known, inelegantly and unobvious of purpose, as the MEA (Multi-Role Enforcement Aircraft) it is a dramatically upscaled Beechcraft Super King Air 350 ER. Crewed by two pilots and two observers who have available: marine search radar, weather radar and an electro-optical/IR sensor. The MEA gives the CBP a speedy (310 mph) platform with an endurance of 6½ hours aloft in a pressurized cabin for its 35,000 feet service altitude.

Customs and Border Protection Multi Enforcement Aircraft patrol the sky over the United States. Photo by Alex Zamora

Customs and Border Protection Multi Enforcement Aircraft on patrol—CBP photo by Alex Zamora

Integrated Systems Multi-role Experimental Aircraft, MEA, in varying stages of build. photo by James Tourtellotte

The Beechcraft Super King Air 350 ER undergoing modification to the Multi-role Experimental Aircraft (MEA)—CBP pphoto by James Tourtellotte

This is a new CBP Plane that does aerial surveillance.

The MEA in profile (interestingly, the tail number doesn’t tally with the FAA data base as of August 2016)—CBP photo

This is a new CBP Plane that does aerial surveillance.

This Beechcraft Super King Air 350 ER after completion to the MEA standard—CBP photo

blog Beechcraft Super King Air 350 ER flowng by CPB as their MEA by CBP 13081247855_d1d59a518f_o

A CBP MEA awaiting duty (interestingly, the tail number doesn’t tally with the FAA data base as of August 2016)—CBP photo

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5 Comments leave one →
  1. 10 August 2016 18:23

    Heavily tricked out for a relatively small aircraft!

    • travelforaircraft permalink*
      11 August 2016 21:17

      And I’m sure it meets the usual luxurious government comfort standards 😉

  2. 10 August 2016 19:13

    Following up on your observation about the registration number. That number on the side of the plane looks as if it is stuck on as an afterthought. Is it some kind of removable peel-off sticker? Black ops disguise perhaps?

    • travelforaircraft permalink*
      11 August 2016 21:16

      Yes, I agree…it looks wonky. One of the other tail numbers was also incorrect in the FAA database as well. Just another government conspiracy 😉

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