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Aérospatiale-BAC Concorde SST walkaround—first part of two

22 August 2016

47° 31′ 11″ N / 122° 17′ 58″ W

British Airways Aérospatiale-BAC Concorde SST — photo by Joseph May

British Airways Aérospatiale-BAC Concorde SST, note the slender fuselage of this first class only airliner—photo by Joseph May

This SST, an Aérospatiale-BAC Concorde is displayed in a new hangar at the Museum of Flight in Seattle WA. At the time of this visit it was outside under a clear sky that was illuminated by wonderful ambient lighting. Next Wednesday’s posting will have the second part.

British Airways Aérospatiale-BAC Concorde SST — photo by Joseph May

British Airways Aérospatiale-BAC Concorde’s long nose gear—photo by Joseph May

British Airways Aérospatiale-BAC Concorde SST — photo by Joseph May

British Airways Aérospatiale-BAC Concorde SST looking aft—photo by Joseph May

British Airways Aérospatiale-BAC Concorde SST — photo by Joseph May

British Airways Aérospatiale-BAC Concorde SST with its tail strike preventer—photo by Joseph May

British Airways Aérospatiale-BAC Concorde SST — photo by Joseph May

British Airways Aérospatiale-BAC Concorde SST four powerful turbojet engine exhaust cones—photo by Joseph May

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2 Comments leave one →
  1. 22 August 2016 15:21

    Aahhh! Concorde……goodness, that takes me back! In 1984 I was extremely fortunate enough to ‘fifth-seat’ the sister ship of ‘Alpha Golf’, as supernumerary, from engine start to Mach 2.02 and FL650. ‘Alpha Fox’ led a very eventful life, later losing around half its rudder (the rudder is split into an upper and lower section as you can see) somewhere over the Australian Outback! She is now in preservation, back home in Bristol, U.K.

    I enjoyed my flight immensely. It is a salutary experience to look dead ahead through the fused quartz heatshield and see a clear line – deep blue below, the black of space above.

    What did I do? Monitored the radiation dosiometer (don’t want to expose the PAX to a ‘jolt’ from Sol) and watch a couple of fuel transfers (Concorde shifts fuel around to maintain trim). Due to frictional heating, the aircraft is some 6 inches LONGER after the normal sector!

    One last quirk – with no flaps on that ogive wing, you really do need that droop snoot, so you can set up a high drag approach.

    It was fun!

    • travelforaircraft permalink*
      23 August 2016 07:40

      Your are full of experiences Ross 🙂 Yes, those big delta wings and their high alpha landings though the Concorde’s visor if staying in place, would have been problematic for the flight crew :@

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