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Fancy Sea Knights

1 September 2016
030315-N-8497H-001 The Arabian Gulf (Mar. 15, 2003) -- A Sailor on the flight deck aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) directs a CH-46 Sea Knight from the fast combat support ship USS Camden (AOE 2) during an underway replenishment. USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) and Carrier Air Wing One Four (CVW-14) are conducting flight operations in support of Operation Southern Watch. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 3rd Class Lewis Hunsaker. (RELEASED)

A Sailor on the flight deck aboard USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) directs a CH-46 Sea Knight from the fast combat support ship USS Camden (AOE 2) during an underway replenishment—U.S. Navy photo by Photographer’s Mate 3rd Class Lewis Hunsaker

030228-N-5362F-003 Arabian Gulf (Feb. 28, 2003) -- A CH-46E “Sea Knight” helicopter carries supplies and stores from the fast combat support ship USS Camden (AOE 2) during a vertical replenishment (VERTREP) with the aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72). Lincoln and Carrier Air Wing Fourteen (CVW 14) are conducting operations in support of Operation Southern Watch. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate Airman Bernardo Fuller. (RELEASED)

A CH-46E Sea Knight helicopter supplying stores from the fast combat support ship USS Camden (AOE 2) during a vertical replenishment (VERTREP) with the aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72)—U.S. Navy photo by Photographer’s Mate Airman Bernardo Fuller

030315-N-9593M-033 The Arabian Gulf (Mar. 15, 2003) -- An CH-46 Sea Knight helicopter assigned to Helicopter Combat Support Squadron Eleven (HC 11) prepares to pick up sling loaded cargo from the fast combat support ship USS Camden (AOE 2) during an Underway Replenishment (UNREP) with the aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72). Lincoln and Carrier Air Wing Fourteen (CVW 14) are conducting combat operations in support of Operation Southern Watch. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 3rd Class Philip A. McDaniel. (RELEASED)

A CH-46 Sea Knight helicopter assigned to Helicopter Combat Support Squadron Eleven (HC 11) prepares to pick up sling loaded cargo from the fast combat support ship USS Camden (AOE 2) during an Underway Replenishment (UNREP) with the aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72)—U.S. Navy photo by Photographer’s Mate 3rd Class Philip A. McDaniel

030321-N-6020P-015 The Arabian Gulf (Mar. 21, 2003) -- A Sailor aboard fast combat support ship USS Rainier (AOE 7) attaches a cargo hook to a CH-46 Sea Knight assigned to the “Gunbearers” of Helicopter Combat Support Squadron Elevenn Detachment Five (HC-11 Det. 5), during a recent vertical replenishment (VERTREP) at sea with the aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72). Lincoln and Carrier Air Wing Fourteen (CVW-14) are conducting combat operations in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate Airman Gabriel Piper. (RELEASED)

A Sailor aboard fast combat support ship USS Rainier (AOE 7) attaches a cargo hook to a CH-46 Sea Knight assigned to the “Gunbearers” of Helicopter Combat Support Squadron Eleven Detachment Five (HC-11 Det. 5), during a recent vertical replenishment (VERTREP) at sea with the aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72)—U.S. Navy photo by Photographer’s Mate Airman Gabriel Piper

030325-N-0295M-004 The Arabian Gulf (Mar. 23, 2003) -- A colorful CH-46 Sea Knight from Helicopter Composite Squadron 11 (HC-11) lands aboard USS Constellation (CV 64) during vertical replenishment operations in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. Operation Iraqi Freedom is the multinational coalition effort to liberate the Iraqi people, eliminate Iraq's weapons of mass destruction and end the regime of Saddam Hussein. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 2nd Class Daniel J. McLain. (RELEASED)

A colorful CH-46 Sea Knight from Helicopter Composite Squadron 11 (HC-11) lands aboard USS Constellation (CV 64) during vertical replenishment operations in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom—U.S. Navy photo by Photographer’s Mate 2nd Class Daniel J. McLain

020430-N-3889M-003 Yigo, Guam (Apr. 30, 2002) -- A maintenance crew performs routine maintenance on a CH-46 “Sea Knight” helicopter attached to the “Providers” of Helicopter Combat Support Squadron Five (HC-5). The CH-46 is a tandem-rotor transport helicopter designed for both land and sea based operations. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer’s Mate 2nd Class Marjorie McMillen. (RELEASED)

A maintenance crew performs routine maintenance on a CH-46 Sea Knight helicopter attached to the “Providers” of Helicopter Combat Support Squadron Five (HC-5) in Yugo Guam—U.S. Navy photo by Photographer’s Mate 2nd Class Marjorie McMillen

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11 Comments leave one →
  1. 1 September 2016 02:21

    Nose art has evolved.. It is more artistic, and you don’t see nekkid pinup pics like the nose art of WW2. No one complained back then when all the planes were overseas in a war zone, and all the pilots and crews were male. Times have changed on that, and there are a lot of women both flying and working on the aircraft. What was acceptable in 1943 is no longer acceptable.

    Invention of the airbrush has revolutionized airplane decoration in general. Nose art has become more sophisticated and beautiful as well.

    In the 1960s, when I was teaching in Memphis, we only lived a half mile from the college, and I walked to work unless we were having bad weather. My walk took me past the armory. In front of the building the Memphis Belle was on static display on concrete pads. the plexiglass was badly yellowed and beginning to develop cracks from the sun, The olive drab paint was also aging. You could see a lot of wasps flying around it, and I assume the plane was full of wasp nests.

    The Memphis city fathers were under fire for how they were letting that piece of history slowly decay, but there was no budget or skilled work force who knew how to care for or restore historic airplanes. They dismantled it and moved it downtown for display under what amounted to a tent. It continued to deteriorate, so finally the Air Force wanted it back. The USAF took it to Dayton and restoration/preservation experts restored it to it’s original condition. It’s on display at the USAF museum in Dayton.

  2. John C Bishop permalink
    1 September 2016 08:12

    I just wanted to provide a update on the Memphis Belle at Air Force Museum. The Belle is undergoing an amazing,complete restoration that will take years to complete. The attention to detail of the restoration crew is first rate and it will be worth the wait. Because of this total rework of the airframe the Belle is presently not on public display. That will happen years from now once completed. Limited tours of the restoration facility are available where one can view the Belle along with other projects including the B-17D “The Swooze” . Regards, John

    • 1 September 2016 11:51

      John,
      Thank you for the update. I have been to Dayton only a few times, but every time was on business and was a flying trip, no pun intended. Upshot was I have never been to the USAF museum or the Wright shop and museum. I lost track of exactly what they were doing with the Memphis Belle after it left Memphis for Dayton. I did not realize the restoration was taking this long. Considering how it looked in 1969-70, only twenty-five years after the war, I can only imagine what kind of shape it must have been in by the time they got it to Ohio.

      • travelforaircraft permalink*
        2 September 2016 13:48

        Thank you both for the nice conversation. Joe

    • travelforaircraft permalink*
      2 September 2016 13:49

      Yes, these folks are amazing. What is better than a great graphic? A flying great graphic!

    • travelforaircraft permalink*
      2 September 2016 13:51

      Thanks again John. I saw her years ago, disassembled but cleaned up. A post on the progress is in order. Thank you, Joe

      • John C Bishop permalink
        3 September 2016 12:53

        Hi Joe, Thanks for the response. I think we all can’t wait to see her done, I’m sure it will be worth the wait! Hope you get the chance to visit the museum soon, the WW2 collection is amazing! I live just over a hour’s drive South of Wright-Pat so pretty lucky to pop in numberous times each year. Take care and hope you get there SOON! Regards, John

  3. david lord permalink
    1 September 2016 09:51

    PLEASE pass my THANKS FOR THEIR SERVICE, SALUTES AND SALUTATIONS! to all these TERRIFIC MILITARY PHOTOGRAPHERS,[ARMY NAVY, AIRFORCE,MARINES AND COAST GUARD] who keep us abreast of the ” goings on” in our military!…

    I agree with Mr. Stanley….though I confess I have no problems with “nekked women!..different era!….but he’s right….women are in the military….so behavior is important!

    Every work of graphics today is exquisite and with good graphic design and _ has_ become much more contemporary. I’m sure the superiors have final ‘clamp down’ (final say) on what gets shown and what doesn’t!…so we’re “safe”! ART is IMPORTANT!! :-)….

    There’s some nice work on the sides of military craft and again, he’s correct…airbrush does open all kinds of ‘new’ work….but historically, those ARTISTS in the military who put true ART of naked women on the side of their planes did exquisite brush work also….One of the strongest “corporate identities” adorns the bows of our proud Coast Guard, probably done with big brushes!! lol!….and created by a first class designer. .

    Best, David

    • 1 September 2016 12:11

      David,
      The Coast Guard got its racing stripe, or “slash” design as the result of a series of events worth a long story all by itself. During the JFK administration, the Air Force came up with a distinctive design for Air Force One. Kennedy did not like it, thinking it looked too regal, probably more suited for some third world dictator. Jackie Kennedy suggested he talk with French born industrial designer and artist, Raymond Loewy. Loewy came up with a design for Air Force One which everyone liked.

      The President was so impressed with his work, that he asked him to come up with something distinctive for the USCG. At that time, Coast Guard vessels were often mistaken for Navy. Loewy came up with the racing stripe, which was adopted officially in 1967.

      That stripe has been successful for a number of reasons. For one thing, Coast Guard cutters and aircraft can be easily identified as associated with rescue missions. The slash design was such a good idea that it has been adopted by the Coast Guard services of over 40 nations.

      Loewy was a design genius.
      Link to a few of his designs.

      • travelforaircraft permalink*
        2 September 2016 13:47

        Chuck. Remarkable history depth you have. In the age of branding this information is a wonderful insight. Thanks, Joe

    • travelforaircraft permalink*
      3 September 2016 23:24

      Never underestimate a man with a mission.

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