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The Bone

6 February 2017

The Bone.

The B-1 and in B-0ne as in bone.

The Lancer.

A crew of four for low level conventional (though designed for nuclear delivery originally) strikes or tremendous loiter time with a mixed war load for asymmetric warfare.

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The B-1 Lancer, an aircraft of curves—DoD photo

A B-1B Lancer from Ellsworth Air Force Base, S.D., sits on the flightline at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, April 9 during Red Flag-Alaska 07-1. Red Flag-Alaska enables aircrews to sharpen their combat skills by flying simulated combat sorties in a realistic threat environment. Additionally, the training allows them to exchange tactics, techniques, and procedures and improve interoperability. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Joshua Strang)

A B-1B Lancer sits on the flightline—U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Joshua Strang

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The cockpit of the B-1—DoD photo

A B-1 Lancer from the 7th Bomb Wing at Dyess Air Force Base, Tex., makes a high speed pass Sept. 14 during a fire power demonstration at the Nevada Test and Training Range. The demonstration gave spectators a close-up and realistic view into the Air Force's ability to perform its wartime mission. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Brian Ybarbo)

A B-1 Lancer making a high speed pass—U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Brian Ybarb

A B-1B Lancer takes off from Al Udeid Air Base, Qatar, to conduct combat operations April 8, 2015. Al Udeid AB is a strategic coalition base that supports over 90 combat and support aircraft and houses more than 5,000 military personnel. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman James Richardson)

A B-1B Lancer taking off with afterburners for combat operations April 2015—U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman James Richardson

A B-1B Lancer takes off from Ellsworth Air Force Base, S.D., March 27, 2011, on a mission in support of Operation Odyssey Dawn. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Marc I. Lane)

A B-1B Lancer taking off in the South Dakota winter—U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Marc I. Lane

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“No Antidote”—USAF photo

An assortment of 500-pound and 2,000-pound joint direct attack munitions are connected to a multiple ejector rack on a B-1B Lancer March 31, 2011, at a weapons load barn at Dyess Air Force Base, Texas. If fielded, a 16-carry modified rotary launcher will increase the number of 500-pound JDAMs and laser-guided JDAMs carried by a B-1B from 15 to 48, a 320 percent increase in capability. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Shannon Hall)

An assortment of 500-pound and 2,000-pound bombs mounted to a multiple ejector rack on a B-1B Lancer. The rack is rotated to drop the weapon of choice—U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Shannon Hall

Maj. Nathan Rowan prepares to board a B-1B Lancer for the last mission of his deployment Jan. 23, 2010, at an air base in Southwest Asia. Major Rowan is a B-1B Lancer pilot assigned to the 37th Expeditionary Bomb Squadron. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Manuel J. Martinez)

Maj. Nathan Rowan boarding his B-1B Lancer—U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Manuel J. Martinez

A B-1 Lancer assigned to 7th Operations Group at Dyess Air Force Base, Texas, departs for a training mission March 3, 2010 at Red Flag 10-3, at Nellis AFB, Nev. Red Flag is a realistic combat training exercise involving the air forces of the United States and its allies. The exercise is conducted on the 15,000-square-mile Nevada Test and Training Range, north of Las Vegas. (U.S. Air Force photo /Airman 1st Class Brett Clashman)

A B-1 Lancer departing—U.S. Air Force photo /Airman 1st Class Brett Clashman

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4 Comments leave one →
  1. 6 February 2017 22:15

    The B-1B, “BONE” has a crew of four not two.

  2. 6 February 2017 22:16

    The B-1B, “BONE” is not nuclear capable anymore.

    • travelforaircraft permalink*
      8 February 2017 04:08

      Indeed, I blew that one but fixed it thanks to your help 🙂

    • travelforaircraft permalink*
      8 February 2017 04:09

      Wow! I had no idea but you inspired me to look that up. Our treaty or treaties with Russia I see.

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