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Texans Now and Texans Then

20 February 2017
160621-N-HV841-002 WHITING FIELD, Fla. (June 21, 2016) Three U.S. Navy T-6B "Texan II" aircraft assigned to Training Air Wing FIVE, fly over Naval Air Station Whiting Field in Milton, Florida. Aircraft 166010 is the first T-6B delivered to the United States Navy on August 25, 2009 and aircraft 166260 is the 148th and final T-6B delivered to TRAWING-5 by Beechcraft Defense Company, a subsidiary of Textron Aviation. Since replacing the venerable Beechcraft T-34C "Turbo Mentor" and achieving initial operating capability in April 2010 at Naval Air Station Whiting Field, the T-6B has proven to be a highly dependable turboprop trainer whose primary mission is to train future Navy, Coast Guard and Marine Corps aviators. The three aircraft performed three flyovers of the base before landing to highlight the milestone. U.S. Navy photo by Ensign Antonio More' / released.

A trio of U.S. Navy Beechcraft T-6B Texan II aircraft—U.S. Navy photo by Ensign Antonio Moré

160621-N-HV841-001 - NAS WHITING FIELD, Fla. - Three T-6B Texan IIs bank toward Naval Air Station Whiting Field to help celebrate the arrival of the 148th and final T-6B aircraft to serve as part of Training Air Wing FIVE's primary training fleet. The first T-6 to arrive to Naval Air Station Whiting Field, the centennial color schemed T-6, and the final Texan II to be sent to Training Air Wing FIVE flew three formation passes over the base before landing at the installation's North Field for a ceremony to mark the occasion. U.S. Navy photo by Ensign Antonio More' / released.

Three Beechcraft T-6B Texan IIs bank into toward Naval Air Station Whiting Field FL—U.S. Navy photo by Ensign Antonio Moré

140924-N-OY799-058 PATUXENT RIVER, Md. (Sept. 24, 2014) A T-6B Texan aircraft is on the flight line at the U.S. Naval Test Pilot School at Naval Air Station Patuxent River. The school provides instruction to experienced pilots, flight officers and engineers in the processes and techniques of aircraft and systems test and evaluation. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Kenneth Abbate/Released)

Beechcraft T-6B Texan aircraft on the flight line at the U.S. Naval Test Pilot School at Naval Air Station Patuxent River—U.S. Navy photo by Mass Comm Spec 2nd Class Kenneth Abbate

030807-N-0000X-002 Naval Air Station Pensacola, Fla. (Aug. 7, 2003) -- The T-6 Texan training aircraft prepares to takes off from the flight line at Naval Air Station (NAS) Pensacola. The Texan well replace the Navy’s T-34C Turbo Mentors and the Air Force T-37B “Tweety Bird” as the primary pilot training aircraft at both NAS Pensacola and NAS Whiting Field. Only one model of aircraft well be used for training Air Force and Navy pilots, as part of the Department of Defense’s effort to streamline military training operations, reduce costs, while increasing efficiency. U.S. Navy photo. (RELEASED)

Beechcraft T-6 Texan  II training aircraft pilots readying for take off—U.S. Navy photo

070620-N-1688B-121 VIRGINIA BEACH, Va. (June 20, 2007) - During an air show to commemorate the World War II Battle of Midway, a 1949 North American T-6G aircraft lands on the grass airfield, at the Virginia Beach Airport. The U.S. Naval Institute sponsored an air show and dinner celebration in honor of veterans who served in the Battle of Midway, as well as veterans of that era still living today. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Matthew Bookwalter (RELEASED)

North American T-6G aircraft lands on the grass airfield—U.S. Navy photo by Mass Comm Spec Seaman Matthew Bookwalter

061008-N-7286M-060 Coronado, Calif. (Oct. 8, 2006) - Vintage T-6 “Texan” aircraft conduct a formation flyover as part of the SRT Coronado Classic Speed Festival opening ceremonies held on Naval Base Coronado air strip. The SRT Coronado Classic Speed Festival featured over 200 classic racecars from around the world competing on a 1.6-mile course. Speed Fest, held Oct. 7-8, is one of the many events taking place during San Diego Fleet Week. U.S. Navy

Vintage T-6 Texan aircraft—U.S. Navy photo

061008-N-7286M-047 Coronado, Calif. (Oct. 8, 2006) - Vintage T-6 “Texan” aircraft conduct a formation flyover as part of the SRT Coronado Classic Speed Festival opening ceremonies held on Naval Base Coronado air strip. The SRT Coronado Classic Speed Festival featured over 200 classic racecars from around the world competing on a 1.6-mile course. Speed Fest, held Oct. 7-8, is one of the many events taking place during San Diego Fleet Week. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Daniel R. Mennuto (RELEASED)

Vintage T-6 Texans in formation flight—U.S. Navy photo by Mass Comm Spec 2nd Class Daniel R. Mennuto

060421-N-0000T-001 Jacksonville, Fla. (April 21, 2006) - Cmdr. Mike Ginter, Operations Officer aboard USS John F. Kennedy (CV 67), raffled off a ride in his World War II T-6 Texan aircraft for every 100 tickets sold in an effort to raise money for the Navy Marine Corps Relief Society. Aviation Electronics Technician Timothy Bostic won the first raffle and is pictured above with Cmdr. Ginter piloting the aircraft over downtown Jacksonville. U.S. Navy photo (RELEASED)

Cmdr. Mike Ginter, Operations Officer aboard USS John F. Kennedy (CV 67) pilots Aviation Electronics Technician Timothy Bostic who won a charity raffle to fly on the aircraft over Jacksonville FL—U.S. Navy photo

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2 Comments leave one →
  1. 20 February 2017 14:12

    I have some dual instruction in a T-6 a few years ago. Not very fast, but you can do most anything you want in it. After some slow flight in an extreme nose high attitude, I had leg cramps holding right rudder against the torque. It is not a particularly forgiving airplane. It will tell you when you screw up.

    If I win the lottery, I want either a Yak-52 or a Nanching CJ-6.

    Turboprops are wonderful, but I am old fashioned, preferring the burbling rumble of a big round engine.

    • travelforaircraft permalink*
      20 February 2017 17:36

      Yes, the radial roar!

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