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!!! TPM Calendar—limited edition and a unique gift !!!

26 November 2016

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The People’s Mosquito (TPM) calendar is printed on high quality stock, possesses a dozen coffee table format sized historic images (from two private collections) and has plenty of space for notes. Get one for yourself, get a handful as gifts, and support the noble effort to bring a de Havilland Mosquito to the skies under the public trust. Get The People’s Mosquito Calendar 2017 here and also enjoy the wonderful captioning by Ross Sharp of TPM.

It is limited in edition and absolutely perfect for gifting—holiday season and otherwise!

The other double bubble—NASA’s Double Bubble D8

23 November 2016
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Double Bubble D8 concept vehicle—NASA/MIT/Aurora Flight Sciences image

Previous double bubble designs have had one fuselage atop another but what’s not to like about the concept of a side-by-side double bubble fuselage lifting body with embedded engines flying 180 passengers over 3000 miles at a cruising speed of Mach 0.74?

The Navy’s dual role aircraft for C3 and Airborne Launch Control System (ALCS) to launch the nuclear missiles—Boeing’s E-6B Mercury

21 November 2016

Boeing’s E-6B Mercury aircraft, evolved from the E-6A Hermes, is flown by the U.S. Navy from Tinker AFB and replaces the EC-135 aircraft employed for Looking Glass missions. The Navy Air Systems Command web site has the following information about this powerful aircraft:

Aircrew members from the 9th Air Refueling Squadron, Travis AFB, California refuel a Navy E6 B Mercury somewhere over the Nevada California border, Aug. 5,2014. (Released - U.S. Air Force Photograph/Heide Couch)

A U.S. Navy Boeing E-6B Mercury, somewhere over the Nevada/CA border, during August 2016 moving in to refuel from a USAF KC-10 tanker aircraft—U.S. Air Force photograph/Heide Couch

Mission

Communications relay and strategic airborne command post aircraft. Provides survivable, reliable, and endurable airborne command, control, and communications between the National Command Authority (NCA) and U.S. strategic and non-strategic forces. Two squadrons, the “Ironmen” of VQ-3 and the “Shadows” of VQ-4 deploy more than 20 aircrews from Tinker Air Force Base OK to meet these requirements.

Boeing derived the E-6A from its commercial 707 to replace the aging EC-130Q in the performance of the Navy’s TACAMO (“Take Charge and Move Out”) mission. TACAMO links the NCA with naval ballistic missile forces during times of crisis. The aircraft carries a very low frequency communication system with dual trailing wire antennas. The Navy accepted the first E-6A in August 1989.

The E-6B was conceived as a replacement for the Air Force’s Airborne Command Post due to the age of the EC-135 fleet. The E-6B is an improved E-6A by way of adding battlestaff positions and other specialized equipment. The E-6B is a dual-mission aircraft capable of fulfilling either the E-6A mission or the airborne strategic command post mission and is equipped with an airborne launch control system (ALCS) which can launch the U.S. land based intercontinental ballistic missiles, as well. The first E-6B aircraft was accepted in December 1997 and the E-6B assumed its dual operational mission in October 1998. The entire E-6 fleet was completely modified to the E-6B configuration in 2003.

141115-N-ZZ999-113 SOLOMONS ISLAND, Md. (Nov. 15, 2015) A U.S. Navy P-8 Mercury airborne command post flies over Solomons Island, Md. The aircraft provides airborne command, control, and communications. (U.S. Navy photo/Released)

A U.S. Navy Boeing E-6B Mercury airborne command post aircraft provides airborne command, control, and communications as well as ALCS—U.S. Navy photo

Characteristics 

Primary Function: Communications relay for fleet ballistic missile submarines (A and B models) and airborne command post for U.S. Strategic forces (B model).
Contractor: The Boeing Company.
Date Deployed: October 1998.
Unit Cost: 141.7 million.
Propulsion: Four CFM-56-2A-2 High bypass turbofans.
Length: 150 feet, 4 inches (45.8 meters).
Height: 42 feet 5 inches (12.9 meters).
Wingspan: 148 feet, 4 inches (45.2 meters).
Weight: Max gross, take-off. 342,000 lbs (154,400 kg).
Airspeed: 522 knots, 600 miles (960 km) per hour.
Ceiling: Above 40,000 feet.
Range: 6,600 nautical miles (7,590 statute miles, 12,144 km) with 6 hours loiter time.
Crew: 22

030429-N-9999Z-001 Cecil Field, Fla. (Apr. 29, 2003) -- An E-6B Mercury is being moved into a Hanger at the Boeing Aerospace Support Center, Cecil Field Fla., to be retrofitted with a new cockpit and an advanced communications package. The E-6B is a dual-mission aircraft capable of fulfilling either the E-6A mission or the airborne strategic command post mission and is equipped with an airborne launch control system (ALCS). The ALCS is capable of launching U.S. land based intercontinental ballistic missiles. U.S. Navy photo. (RELEASED)

An E-6B Mercury being moved into a hangar at the Boeing Aerospace Support Center/Cecil Field FL to be retrofitted with a new cockpit and an advanced communications package. The E-6B is a dual-mission aircraft capable of fulfilling either the E-6A mission or the airborne strategic command post mission and is equipped with an airborne launch control system (ALCS) to control the launching of U.S. land based intercontinental ballistic missiles as well as the Navy’s—U.S. Navy photo

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A Boeing E-6B Mercury taxis for another mission—U.S. Navy image

Icon A5—a sportster amphibian

21 November 2016

 

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The oncoming Icon A5—Icon Aircraft image

Seeing a pair of these A5 aircraft flying near the Miami Seaplane Base was thrilling. They are sporty aircraft, easily turning and accelerating at 200 feet altitudes—then alighting on the water of Government Cut with ease. Icon Aircraft produces the A5 which he’s seating for two and is amphibious. The 100 hp Rotax engine gives the A5 a cruising speed of ~100 mph over a rage of   just under 500 miles with reserve. A full airframe parachute and angle-of-attack indicator can also be fitted.

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Characterized by modern material construction, high wing, pusher propeller, sponsons and spin resisting wing cuffs: what’s not to like?—Icon Aircraft image

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Configured for landing the amphibious Icon A5 can operated from most of North America—Icon Aircraft image

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A pair of Icon Aircraft A5 amphibians recreating on a fine day—Icon Aircraft image

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The A5 needs no airport and folding wings enable garage or trailer sheltering—Icon Aircraft image

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The cockpit of the A5 has excellent nearly all-round visibility with a forward hinged canopy and removable side windows—Icon Aircraft image

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The Icon A5 just pulled from the hangar and wings unfolded—Icon Aircraft image

Boeing 747SP Clipper America—her last flight

18 November 2016

 

Boeing 747SP N747NA Nov 2016 at Mojave Nick Veronico image and copyright

Boeing 747SP N747A Nov 2016 at Mojave taxis in one last time—Nick Veronico image and copyright

This Boeing B747SP, known as Clipper America, experienced its last flight yesterday after serving many owners—beginning with Braniff and Pan Am—ending with Ballet San Jose and the San Jose Sharks—with many in between. Landing at the Mojave Air & Space Port (also serving as an airliner storage/boneyard facility) its fate awaits. Recycling most likely, scrapping most assuredly, restoration unlikely.

Boeing 747SP N747NA Nov 2016 at Mojave Nick Veronico image and copyright

Boeing 747SP N747A Nov 2016 at Mojave—Nick Veronico image and copyright

Many thanks to Nick Veronico for the news and the photos🙂

ShinMaywa US-2—full sized seaplane of this day

17 November 2016

 

The Japan Maritime Self Defense Force executes the first training flights for calendar year 2014 aboard Marine Corps Air Station Iwakuni, Japan, Jan. 7, 2014. The flights included a water rescue mission where divers saved a simulated drowning man.

Japan Maritime Self Defense Force ShinMaywa US-2 in flight—USMC image

After the end of WW II Japan’s famous aircraft manufacturer of flying boats, Kawanishi, evolved first into Shin Meiwa and then into Shin Maywa.  Kawanishi designed and built the H6K 九七式大型飛行艇 “Mavis” and the H8K 二式大型飛行艇 “Emily” with the Emily being one of the best flying boats during WW II. As Shin Meiwa, the Grumman Albatross design was improved into the US-1 and US-1A (amphibian version). The US-1 design was powered by four engines with a fifth engine on board to power a boundary layer control system which forces air over the  flaps and elevators to generate more lift by reducing turbulence at low airspeeds—making the aircraft an STOL performer. The US-1 was later improved into the US-2. These aircraft serve in patrol and air/sea rescue work for an island country that has significant maritime interests. A US-1A is on exhibit at the Kanoya Air Base History Museum* 当鹿屋航空基地史料館.

The Japan Maritime Self Defense Force executes the first training flights for calendar year 2014 aboard Marine Corps Air Station Iwakuni, Japan, Jan. 7, 2014. The flights included a water rescue mission where divers saved a simulated drowning man.

A pair of Japan Maritime Self Defense Force ShinMaywa US-2 amphibians on the water in Japan—USMC image

The Japan Maritime Self Defense Force executes the first training flights for calendar year 2014 aboard Marine Corps Air Station Iwakuni, Japan, Jan. 7, 2014. The flights included a water rescue mission where divers saved a simulated drowning man.

A brace of US-2 amphibians of the Japan Maritime Self Defense Force moving along the waters of Japan—USMC image

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A ShinMaywa US-2 on final—USMC image

The Japan Maritime Self Defense Force executes the first training flights for calendar year 2014 aboard Marine Corps Air Station Iwakuni, Japan, Jan. 7, 2014. The flights included a water rescue mission where divers saved a simulated drowning man.

A ShinMaywa US-2 taking off—USMC image

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Another view of a JMSDF US-2 departing for a mission—USMC image

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The US-2’s four primary turboprop engines plus blown flaps powered by a fifth engine(turbojet) leave an enormous amount of spray during water take offs—USMC image

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JMSDF US-2 on approach—USMC image

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JMSDF US-2 meets the water—USMC image

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JMSDF US-2 taxis up the ramp—USMC image

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How personnel can enter or exit the US-2 while afloat—USMC image

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Bringing aboard a simulated casualty using a slide and harnesses—USMC image

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A JMSDF ShinMaywa US-2 awaiting another mission over the waters of Japan—USMC image

Rafale

16 November 2016
070412-N-8157C-542 ARABIAN SEA (April 12, 2007) - A French Rafale from the nuclear-powered aircraft carrier French Navy Ship Charles de Gaulle (R 91) performs a touch-and-go on the flight deck of the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74). Stennis, as part of the John C. Stennis Carrier Strike Group, and Charles de Gaulle, the Flagship of Commander, Task Force 473, are operating in the North Arabian Sea. Stennis and Charles de Gaulle are conducting bilateral exercises and supporting multi-national ground forces in Afghanistan. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Denny Cantrell (RELEASED)

A French Rafale from the nuclear-powered aircraft carrier French Navy Ship Charles de Gaulle (R 91) in the middle of a touch-and-go on the flight deck of the USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74)—U.S. Navy photo by Mass Comm Spec 1st Class Denny Cantrell

ARABIAN GULF (Dec. 20, 2015) A French Rafale Marine aircraft prepares to launch from the flight deck of the aircraft carrier FS Charles de Gaulle (R 91) as the French Navy begins their missions in the Arabian Gulf supporting Operation Inherent Resolve on Dec. 20. In a move that demonstrates the interoperability and partnership between the naval forces of the U.S. and France, the French Navy is leading carrier-based naval strike operations for Commander U.S. Naval Forces Central Command in support of Operation Inherent Resolve – the fight to degrade and ultimately destroy the ISIL terrorist organization. (Photo courtesy of French Navy/Released)

Seconds from launching from the Stennis is this French Rafale Marine from the French Navy aircraft carrier Charles de Gaulle—French Navy photo

050525-N-9641C-001 Atlantic Ocean (May 25, 2005) - A French Navy Rafale M multi-role combat fighter from the French aircraft carrier Charles De Gaulle performs a touch-and-go landing aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69), during the Multi-National Maritime Exercise (MNME) 05-1. More than 17,000 Sailors from the U.S., Canada, France, Great Britain and Spain participated in the exercise. MNME 05-1 is an exercise focused on multi-national maritime interoperability capabilities in support of NATO Response Force (NRF). NRF combines elite land, air, sea, special operations, and mission specific units into a single force that can be deployed anywhere in the world in five days and sustain itself on a wide range of missions. NRF is scheduled to be fully in place by 2006. U.S. Navy photo by Airman Peter Carnicelli (RELEASED)

A French Navy Rafale M multi-role combat fighter from the French aircraft carrier Charles De Gaulle performing a touch-and-go aboard the USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69)—U.S. Navy photo by Airman Peter Carnicelli