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Biscayne Bay Airspace is Busy!

19 September 2016

 

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LAN Airbus on final over Biscayne Bay to MIA—Joseph May/Travel for Aircraft

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Miami-Dade Fire Rescue Bell Twin Huey heading seaward over Government Cut—Joseph May/Travel for Aircraft

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Bell JetRanger orbits Dodge Island—Joseph May/Travel for Aircraft

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Bell JetRanger orbits Dodge Island—Joseph May/Travel for Aircraft

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Robson R44 over Biscayne Bay—Joseph May/Travel for Aircraft

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Robson R44 over Biscayne Bay—Joseph May/Travel for Aircraft

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Cape Air Cessna Caravan on base to arrive at the Miami Seaplane Base (Miami Beach in the background)—Joseph May/Travel for Aircraft

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Cape Air Cessna Caravan over I-395 turning on final for Miami Seaplane Base (wheels up to land on the waters of Government Cut)—Joseph May/Travel for Aircraft

Adolf Dehn and WW II’s LTA Aviation in Watercolor

17 September 2016

 

Adolf Dehn painted these watercolors in 1943 of the U.S. Navy’s Lighter-Than-Air aviation world.

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Out to Sea by Adolf Dehn 1943—Naval History and Heritage Command image

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Lighter-Than-Air Fleet by Adolf Dehn 1943—Naval History and Heritage Command image

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Off to War by Adolf Dehn 1943—Naval History and Heritage Command image

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Landing Lines Trailing by Adolf Dehn 1943—Naval History and Heritage Command image

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Into the Rigging by Adolf Dehn 1943—Naval History and Heritage Command image

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Home the Weary Blimpman Makes His Way by Adolf Dehn 1943—Naval History and Heritage Command image

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Home Berth by Adolf Dehn 1943—Naval History and Heritage Command image

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Free Ballooning by Adolf Dehn 1943—Naval History and Heritage Command image

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Down Ship by Adolf Dehn 1943—Naval History and Heritage Command image

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Blimp Nest by Adolf Dehn 1943—Naval History and Heritage Command image

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By the Light of the Moon by Adolf Dehn 1943—Naval History and Heritage Command image

 

RC-135 Rivet Joint and Combat Sent

16 September 2016

Essentially the Rivet Joint aircraft collect communications signals from the electromagnetic (EM) spectrum for signals intelligence and the Combat Sent collect radar specific signals emitted on the EM spectrum.

An RC-135 Stratoliner aircraft from the 9th Strategic Reconnaissance Wing approaches a KC-135 Stratotanker from the 1700th Air Refueling Squadron Provisional during Operation Desert Shield.

An RC-135 Rivet Joint aircraft from the 9th Strategic Reconnaissance Wing approaching—USAF photo

An RC-135 Rivet Joint flies over Afghanistan Jan. 9. The intelligence reconnaissance aircraft carries a 34-member crew has been consistently deployed to Southwest Asia for a milestone 6,000 days since Aug. 9, 1990, just before Operation Desert Shield. (U.S. Air Force photo/Master Sgt. Scott Wagers)

An RC-135 Rivet Joint, with its 34 member crew, flying Afghanistan skies—U.S. Air Force photo/MSgt. Scott Wagers

Captains Guy Perrow and Erik Dunkley and 1st Lt. Michael Morrison prep a RC-135 Rivet Joint for a flight. RC-135's have been deployed from the 55th Wing at Offutt Air Force Base, Neb., and maintained a constant presence in Southwest Asia for 6,000 days since Aug. 9, 1990, just prior to Operation Desert Shield. Captain Perrow is the aircraft commander, Captain Dunkley is the co-pilot, and Lieutenant Morrison is the navigator. (U.S. Air Force photo/Master Sgt. Scott Wagers)

Captains Guy Perrow (pilot) and Erik Dunkley (copilot) and 1st Lt. Michael Morrison (navigator) prepping their RC-135 Rivet Joint flight—U.S. Air Force photo/MSgt. Scott Wagers

Lt. Col. Doug Sachs and 1st Lt. Beth Brockshus monitor equipment that scans the earth to detect, identify and geolocate signals throughout the electromagnetic spectrum on board an RC-135 Rivet Joint. The two are electronic warfare officers and are two of 34 crew members who fly aboard the RC-135. The crew can forward information in a variety of formats to a wide range of consumers via the plane's extensive communications suite. Colonel Sachs is deployed from Kadena Air Base, Japan, as the 763rd Expeditionary Reconnaissance Squadron commander, and Lieutenant Brockshus is deployed from Offutt Air Force Base, Neb. (U.S. Air Force photo/Master Sgt. Scott Wagers)

Electronic warfare officers (2 of the 34 member crew) Lt. Col. Doug Sachs and 1st Lt. Beth Brockshus monitoring sensors scanning the Earth’s surface to detect, identify and geolocate signals throughout the electromagnetic spectrum on board their RC-135 Rivet Joint—U.S. Air Force photo/MSgt. Scott Wagers

Staff Sgt. John Terlaje and Airman 1st Class Ross Vandenbosch tow an RC-135 Rivet Joint reconnaissance aircraft to a nearby maintenance area. The crew chiefs are deployed from the 55th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron, Offutt Air Force Base, Neb. (U.S. Air Force photo/Master Sgt. Scott Wagers)

Staff Sgt. John Terlaje and Airman 1st Class Ross Vandenbosch towing an RC-135 Rivet Joint reconnaissance aircraft and showing the antennae panels on each fuselage side—U.S. Air Force photo/MSgt. Scott Wagers

FILE PHOTO -- The RC-135U Combat Sent, located at Offutt Air Force Base, Neb., provides strategic electronic reconnaissance information to the president, secretary of defense, Department of Defense leaders and theater commanders. (U.S. Air Force photo)

The RC-135U Combat Sent with its 23 person crew—U.S. Air Force photo

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Another view of a flying RC-135 Rivet Joint clearly showing the plethora of antennae both on the wings as well as fuselage—USAF photo

The Hindenburg in Flames: How a Photograph Marked the End of the Airship

14 September 2016

The Hindenburg in Flames: How a Photograph Marked the End of the Airship, Michael Burgan with Daniel Grossman, 2016, ISBN 978-0756554439, 64 pp.

The Hindenburg in Flames: How a Photograph Marked the End of the Airship by Michael Burgan with Daniel Grossman

The Hindenburg in Flames: How a Photograph Marked the End of the Airship by Michael Burgan with Daniel Grossman

Daniel Grossman, expert in airship history and author of the erudite blog Airships: a Hindenburg and Zeppelin History Site, posted regarding a new book on the Hindenburg.

Yes, another book, as I can feel you inwardly groan.

But, have faith in renowned historian and author Michael Burgan as well as our Daniel Grossman.

In his post, Daniel tells the unique nature of this book. It is written for a younger audience though highly accurate—it appears to be an excellent summary brief in other words as well as wonderful reading material for eager young minds who wish to venture away from their smart phones.

Here are Daniel’s words:

“I was pleased to serve as historical consultant for The Hindenburg in Flames. Although designed for young adult readers, the publisher was determined to create a highly accurate work and I am quite proud of the book we produced.”

The book has been ordered so that a review post can be published.

Ross Sharp, Mirages and and a Halifax hack

12 September 2016

53º 55′ 31″ N / 000° 57′ 56″ W

One of great the joys in life is a wide ranging intelligent conversation and Ross Sharp always more than holds up his side of the conversing. Recently I mentioned to him that the Yorkshire Air Museum & Allied Forces Memorial would soon receive a Dassault Mirage IV. Just as an FYI on my part—I am a dilettante but Ross is the expert.

Ross, though, knows the why about it and more. He wrote to inform me how the museum’s home town of Elvington in the UK was the location of an air base for a pair of Free French bomber squadrons during World War II—the 346 Guyenne and the 347 Tunise. There is more…Ross provided a handful of his photos from the museum as well as insights. These photos show the museum’s Dassault Mirage IIIE aircraft as well as an interesting Handley Page Halifax. The Halifax is interesting since Ross observes one can tell it is a composite restoration, not that the museum is using trickery and Halifax bombers are rare to see these days, using components from the similarly designed Handley Page Hastings. Ross observes the engine spacing is a bit different since a Hastings wing is used. He has a wonderfully written post about this and the Hastings in Handley Page Hastings—coal, cod and the Cold War in his Shortfinal’s Blog (which is an excellent research resource). Ross now keeps us abreast using his Twitter feed @GRossSharp as well as belonging to the cadre of The People’s Mosquito which is building an original deHavilland Mosquito for the public trust (which will be rare).

 

Dassault Mirage IIIE—image copyright by Ross Sharp airshowconsultants@gmail.com

Dassault Mirage IIIE—image copyright by Ross Sharp

Dassault Mirage IIIE—image copyright by Ross Sharp

Dassault Mirage IIIE—image copyright by Ross Sharp

Handley Page Halifax Mk III—image copyright by Ross Sharp

Handley Page Halifax Mk III—image copyright by Ross Sharp

Handley Page Halifax Mk III—image copyright by Ross Sharp

Handley Page Halifax Mk III—image copyright by Ross Sharp

 

NASA’s Martin WB-57 Canberras

9 September 2016
NASA's WB-57 aircraft flying in formation over Houston and JSC, photographed from a Navy T-6 aircraft. Photo Date: November 19, 2015. Photographer: Robert Markowitz

NASA’s three Martin WB-57 Canberra aircraft flying in formation over Houston and the Johnson Space Center—NASA photograph by Robert Markowitz

NASA flies the extremely high altitude WB-57 Canberra for a variety of research purposes. Two immense P&W TF-33 turbofans engines (15,500 pound thrust each) power the Canberra beyond 60,000 feet for up to 6½ hours carrying as much as 6000 pounds of scientific equipment.

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Martin WB-57 Canberra flying for NASA—NASA image

110909-N-ZO368-099 ROTA, SPAIN (Sept. 9, 2011) John Perry, a NASA WB-57 high altitude research aircraft maintainer, conducts start up checks on a WB-57 aircraft at Naval Station Rota, Spain. The crew from the Johnson Space Center visited Rota for routine maintenance and refueling of the aircraft. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Travis Alston/Released)

John Perry, a NASA WB-57 high altitude research aircraft maintainer, conducts start-up checks on a WB-57 aircraft at Naval Station Rota, Spain—U.S. Navy photo by Mass Comm Spec 2nd Class Travis Alston

060224-F-0017M-005 San Diego (Feb. 24, 2006) - A NASA WB-57 loaded with a Battlefield Airborne Communications Node (BACN) communicates with the U.S. Joint Forces Command's Rapid Attack Information Dissemination-Execution Relay mobile vehicle (RAIDER) on board U.S. Marine Corps Air Station Miramar. BACN's forward-edge tactical server provides real-time information access to situation awareness, surveillance, imagery and network-management information for air and ground-based units, including the RAIDER. Northrop Grumman in partnership with NASA's Johnson Space Center is preparing BACN for test evaluation during a joint expeditionary force experiment in April. U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Michele Misiano (RELEASED)

A NASA WB-57 loaded with a Battlefield Airborne Communications Node (BACN) communicates with the U.S. Joint Forces Command’s Rapid Attack Information Dissemination-Execution Relay mobile vehicle (RAIDER) on board U.S. Marine Corps Air Station Miramar. BACN’s forward-edge tactical server provides real-time information access to situation awareness, surveillance, imagery and network-management information for air and ground-based units, including the RAIDER. Northrop Grumman in partnership with NASA’s Johnson Space Center is preparing BACN for test evaluation during a joint expeditionary force experiment—U.S. Air Force photo by Sr Airman Michele Misiano

110909-N-ZO368-248 ROTA, SPAIN (Sept. 9, 2011) A NASA WB-57 high altitude research aircraft takes off from the airfield at Naval Station Rota, Spain. The crew from the Johnson Space Center visited Rota for routine maintenance and refueling of the aircraft. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Travis Alston/Released)

A NASA WB-57 high altitude research aircraft taking off from the airfield at Naval Station Rota, Spain—U.S. Navy photo by Mass Comm Spec 2nd Class Travis Alston

BV 222 Wiking (Viking)

7 September 2016

 

 

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Blohm & Voss BV 222 Wiking taking off, note the wing floats which retreated clamshell style into the underwings—San Diego Air and Space Museum archive photo

One of World War II’s largest flying boats was the Blohm & Voss BV 222 Wiking (Viking), with six Junkers Jumo 207C 6-cylinder 2-stroke diesel fueled engines of 1000 hp each, was produced in the limited quantity of only thirteen. Originally designed as an airliner, the Wiking was noted for its extremely long as well as flat main cabin floor—novel at the time. The militarized version was powered by diesel engines so the aircraft could be refueled at sea by U-boat and was heavily armed with 3 x 20mm cannon and 5 x 13mm machines guns for defensive measures. Crew number eleven to fourteen on missions ranging from transporting as many as 92 troops, 72 litter cases or over 30,000 pounds of cargo. The Wiking’s cruise speed was 186–214 mph (dependent upon altitude) for 3500+ miles. Though a few survived the war sadly none survived much longer, being scrapped or sunk.

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Blohm & Voss BV 222 Wiking in flight with no apparent defensive armament—San Diego Air and Space Museum archive photo

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Blohm & Voss BV 222 Wiking, note the double deck—San Diego Air and Space Museum archive photo

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Blohm & Voss BV 222 Wiking plan sheet—San Diego Air and Space Museum archive photo

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Blohm & Voss BV 222 Wiking being prepped for service—San Diego Air and Space Museum archive photo

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Blohm & Voss BV 222 Wiking afloat—San Diego Air and Space Museum archive photo

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Blohm & Voss BV 222 Wiking port wing 20mm cannon turret—San Diego Air and Space Museum archive photo

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Blohm & Voss BV 222 Wiking taxis—San Diego Air and Space Museum archive photo

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The Blohm & Voss BV 222 Wiking’s size was impressive—San Diego Air and Space Museum archive photo