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Avión tequila aerial banner

8 February 2017
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Avión tequila tow banner—Joseph May/Travel for Aircraft image

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Avión tequila banner—Joseph May/Travel for Aircraft image

Museum reviews soon :)

7 February 2017
Imperial War Museum Duxford--Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Imperial War Museum Duxford–Joseph May:Travel for Aircraft

Farnborough Air Sciences Trust (FAST)--Joseph May: Travel for Aircraft

Farnborough Air Sciences Trust (FAST)–Joseph May: Travel for Aircraft

The Bone

6 February 2017

The Bone.

The B-1 and in B-0ne as in bone.

The Lancer.

A crew of four for low level conventional (though designed for nuclear delivery originally) strikes or tremendous loiter time with a mixed war load for asymmetric warfare.

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The B-1 Lancer, an aircraft of curves—DoD photo

A B-1B Lancer from Ellsworth Air Force Base, S.D., sits on the flightline at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, April 9 during Red Flag-Alaska 07-1. Red Flag-Alaska enables aircrews to sharpen their combat skills by flying simulated combat sorties in a realistic threat environment. Additionally, the training allows them to exchange tactics, techniques, and procedures and improve interoperability. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Joshua Strang)

A B-1B Lancer sits on the flightline—U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Joshua Strang

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The cockpit of the B-1—DoD photo

A B-1 Lancer from the 7th Bomb Wing at Dyess Air Force Base, Tex., makes a high speed pass Sept. 14 during a fire power demonstration at the Nevada Test and Training Range. The demonstration gave spectators a close-up and realistic view into the Air Force's ability to perform its wartime mission. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Brian Ybarbo)

A B-1 Lancer making a high speed pass—U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Brian Ybarb

A B-1B Lancer takes off from Al Udeid Air Base, Qatar, to conduct combat operations April 8, 2015. Al Udeid AB is a strategic coalition base that supports over 90 combat and support aircraft and houses more than 5,000 military personnel. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman James Richardson)

A B-1B Lancer taking off with afterburners for combat operations April 2015—U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman James Richardson

A B-1B Lancer takes off from Ellsworth Air Force Base, S.D., March 27, 2011, on a mission in support of Operation Odyssey Dawn. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Marc I. Lane)

A B-1B Lancer taking off in the South Dakota winter—U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Marc I. Lane

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“No Antidote”—USAF photo

An assortment of 500-pound and 2,000-pound joint direct attack munitions are connected to a multiple ejector rack on a B-1B Lancer March 31, 2011, at a weapons load barn at Dyess Air Force Base, Texas. If fielded, a 16-carry modified rotary launcher will increase the number of 500-pound JDAMs and laser-guided JDAMs carried by a B-1B from 15 to 48, a 320 percent increase in capability. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Shannon Hall)

An assortment of 500-pound and 2,000-pound bombs mounted to a multiple ejector rack on a B-1B Lancer. The rack is rotated to drop the weapon of choice—U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Shannon Hall

Maj. Nathan Rowan prepares to board a B-1B Lancer for the last mission of his deployment Jan. 23, 2010, at an air base in Southwest Asia. Major Rowan is a B-1B Lancer pilot assigned to the 37th Expeditionary Bomb Squadron. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Manuel J. Martinez)

Maj. Nathan Rowan boarding his B-1B Lancer—U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Manuel J. Martinez

A B-1 Lancer assigned to 7th Operations Group at Dyess Air Force Base, Texas, departs for a training mission March 3, 2010 at Red Flag 10-3, at Nellis AFB, Nev. Red Flag is a realistic combat training exercise involving the air forces of the United States and its allies. The exercise is conducted on the 15,000-square-mile Nevada Test and Training Range, north of Las Vegas. (U.S. Air Force photo /Airman 1st Class Brett Clashman)

A B-1 Lancer departing—U.S. Air Force photo /Airman 1st Class Brett Clashman

The last Flying Avro Vulcan—”The Spirit of Great Britain”

1 February 2017

 

Tornado Send Off For Vulcan

The last flying Avro Vulcan “The Spirit of Great Britain” in formation with an element of Tornados—United Kingdom MoD/Crown copyright

The Avro Vulcan is a Cold War classic, a movie star (the 007 film, Thunderbolt) and a beauty. Ross Sharp of Shortfinals’s blog has written an this excellent piece on the Vulcan and this blog has several posts regarding the Vulcan (please use the search window).

Tornado Send Off For Vulcan

The last flying Avro Vulcan “The Spirit of Great Britain” in formation with an element of Tornados—United Kingdom MoD/Crown copyright

Tornado Send Off For Vulcan

The last flying Avro Vulcan “The Spirit of Great Britain” in formation with an element of Tornados—United Kingdom MoD/Crown copyright

Tornado Send Off For Vulcan

The last flying Avro Vulcan “The Spirit of Great Britain” in formation with an element of Tornados—United Kingdom MoD/Crown copyright

Tornado Send Off For Vulcan

The last flying Avro Vulcan “The Spirit of Great Britain”—United Kingdom MoD/Crown copyright

Tornado Send Off For Vulcan

The last flying Avro Vulcan “The Spirit of Great Britain”—United Kingdom MoD/Crown copyright

Tornado Send Off For Vulcan

The last flying Avro Vulcan “The Spirit of Great Britain”—United Kingdom MoD/Crown copyright

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The last flying Avro Vulcan “The Spirit of Great Britain”—United Kingdom MoD/Crown copyright

Vulcan bombers from RAF Waddington flying in formation in 1957.

Vulcan bombers from RAF Waddington flying in formation during 1957—United Kingdom MoD/Crown copyright

blog RIAT 2015 Vulcan-XH558 bomb doors open Alex Horrox

Bomb Bay doors open the last flying Avro Vulcan “The Spirit of Great Britain”—United Kingdom MoD/Crown copyright

SCA-15-904-Vulcan at Southport Airshow

The last flying Avro Vulcan “The Spirit of Great Britain” in formation with The Red Arrows—United Kingdom MoD/Crown copyright

Red Arrows Farewell to the Vulcan

The last flying Avro Vulcan “The Spirit of Great Britain” in formation with The Red Arrows—United Kingdom MoD/Crown copyright

The Red Arrows have flown with the Vulcan bomber for the final time in a show of great British aviation icons. Jets from the Royal Air Force Aerobatic Team performed a flypast with the mighty Cold War aircraft at the Southport Air Show this afternoon (Saturday, September 19th, 2015). Thousands of people cheered and waved as the Red Arrows’ nine distinctive British-built Hawk aircraft made a V-shape in front of the Vulcan.

The last flying Avro Vulcan “The Spirit of Great Britain” in formation with The Red Arrows—United Kingdom MoD/Crown copyright

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The last flying Avro Vulcan “The Spirit of Great Britain” in formation with The Red Arrows—United Kingdom MoD/Crown copyright

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Seen from a Red Arrow the last flying Avro Vulcan “The Spirit of Great Britain” in formation with The Red Arrows—United Kingdom MoD/Crown copyright

The Handbook of Logistics and Distribution Management

31 January 2017

The Handbook of Logistics and Distribution Management, Alan Rushton/Phil Croucher/Peter Baker, 2017, SBN 978 0 7494 7677 9, 837 pp.

The Handbook of Logistics and Distribution Management by Alan Rushton/Phil Croucher/Peter Baker

The Handbook of Logistics and Distribution Management by Alan Rushton/Phil Croucher/Peter Baker

The 830+ pages of this erudite publication explains the considerations of logistics and distribution—more than living up to the promise of its title. The authors have complimentary experience as well as overlapping education and it is hard to think of a better mix of a team of authors for this handbook.

Although not addressing human or cultural aspects the authors mention handling corruption as well as the substantial differences between major countries across the globe when gross domestic product logistical costs are compared (curiously China is the highest and Netherlands the lowest).

This book gets to the nitty-gritty of all aspects for business-to-business logistical as well as distribution needs, such as:

  • Warehousing, warehousing design, specialty warehousing and locating
  • Freight transport in rail, maritime, air and over-the-road
  • Transportation type selection fer each freight method mentioned above
  • Storage and handling systems—palletized and non-palletized—reach trucks and counterbalanced fork-lift trucks
  • Dispatch
  • Receiving
  • Customer care strategies
  • Procurement, inventory and supply logic
  • When and where to consider outsourcing tasks or phases

These authors have produced a fine book for the planning as well as improving the lifeblood of manufacture which is logistics and distribution. A professional level book for the serious and succesful with an index well done, more than enough schematics and photos to aid in understanding the nicely written text, as well as a superb acronym guide.

Kogan Page has The Handbook of Logistics and Distribution Management is available here with shipping free within the UK and United States.

Understanding Planned Obsolescence

31 January 2017

Understanding Planned Obsolescence: Unsustainability through production, consumption and waste generation, Kamila Pope, 2017, ISBN 978 0 7494 7805 6, 212 pp.

Understanding Planned Obsolescence: Unsustainability through production, consumption and waste generation by Kamila Pope

Understanding Planned Obsolescence: Unsustainability through production, consumption and waste generation by Kamila Pope

Pope has written an outstanding text for moving beyond the current economy of endless production with ceaseless exploitation of resources to a circular economy—that is a system where waste from production is input to another process and energy is supplanted with renewable sources.

Pope is the author to do this with her admirable background in law as well as economics. Fortunately, she is from Brazil so has researched her subject in many languages so there is no English-only sunglasses over her eyes. During her well-referenced writing the reader quickly notices thoughts, deeds and citations from Europe, North and South America. The amount of thinking is world-view and thorough. The citations are plentiful and serve as waypoints for this in-depth discussion of the planned obsolescence methodology which is ubiquitous in our society—both in how it came to be and how it may (should?) evolve to intelligent sustainability through engineering, science and law.

Interestingly, planned obsolescence has its roots in the Depression Era but mutated into a handful of forms from unnecessarily complex engineering (more parts to fail), overpriced parts (so one purchases a new machine instead of repairing it) to programmed obsolescence (a computer operating system update requires a more advanced machine as well as outdating software programs). Who knew that planned obsolescence originated as tampering with the idea being to simply keep demand for production up. Thanks to the author we know the ground and the unwritten though well researched culture of planned obsolescence.

Pope segues to the concept of a looping economic model of production instead of a linear one. Production where there is truly no waste since the waste itself is a product for another process. Changing a paradigm is not an easy task and the producers have a huge advantage with their inherent control of products since people desire or require those products—having to survive the day as opposed to thinking down the road.

This is where Pope’s legal background steps onto center stage since society changes with its laws (Who wore seatbelts until using them was mandated?) along with economic incentives (e.g., use of seatbelts decreased insurance rates). Two cases against Apple are described. In Westley v Apple the case centers on Apple’s apparently outrageous design of an iPod where the battery was not replaceable (toss the old iPod and buy a new one—hardly world citizen philosophy of design). Another in Brazil v Apple regarding the release of iPad 4 only months after the release of iPad3 which instantly rendered iPad3 less than desirable.

Pope’s book has an excellent index, citations are complete and the list of acronym explanations os most welcome for this new as well as exciting field. Economists, industry captains and law forms working toward the future will welcome this book. Those wanting to understand the world we are all currently in will appreciate the pulling back of the curtain to see the mechanism of planned obsolescence and how it affects our everyday lives. This is a 1A professional level book rich in source material as well as intelligent and cogent thought.

Kogan Page has Understanding Planned Obsolescence available here with shipping free within the UK and United States.

The Royal Air Force Aerobatic Team—known to us all as The Red Arrows

30 January 2017
'Red 6' of the world famous air display team the Red Arrows is pictured during a transit flight from Denmark back to the UK, after a display at Gilze Rijen. In the background the front half of the 9 display aircraft can be seen in battle formation. This image was a winner in the 2014 RAF Photographic Competition.

‘Red 6’ of the world famous air display team the Red Arrows in transit with half of the nine display aircraft in the flying in battle formation—United Kingdom MoD/Crown copyright

Pictured is part of the Red Arrows display tem flying over China. Aviation history was made by the Royal Air Force Aerobatic Team when the Red Arrows performed a public display in China for the first time. The show takes the number of countries in which the Red Arrows have performed to 57 since 1965 – the team’s opening season.

Red Arrows in performance from within the formation—United Kingdom MoD/Crown copyright

 

The Red Arrows are pictured flying over Scotland, taken from the cockpit of one of their aircraft. The Royal Air Force Hawk jet aircraft comprise the world famous RAF Aerobatic Team.

Flying with The Red Arrows over Scotlandare pictured flying over Scotland—United Kingdom MoD/Crown copyright

A Royal Air Force Red Arrows Hawk jet screams towards the photographer in this dramatic image. The Reds were practicing their 2009 summer season display at RAF Akrotiri in Cyprus.

Trailing smoke, while coming in low and fast, this Red Arrows Hawk coming at you—United Kingdom MoD/Crown copyright

Red 10 & 11 of the RAF Aerobatic Team, The Red Arrows, practicing their manoeuvres over RAF Scampton, Lincoln. This picture shows the pilots view.

Inverted and in formation, Red 10 & 11 of the RAF Aerobatic Team, The Red Arrows, practice their maneuvers—United Kingdom MoD/Crown copyright

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The nine Red Arrows in formation with an element of Spitfires as well as an element of Hurricanes—United Kingdom MoD/Crown copyright

The Royal Air Force Aerobatic Team (RAFAT), "The Red Arrows" display over RAF Scampton, Lincoln.

The Royal Air Force Aerobatic Team (RAFAT), “The Red Arrows” display over RAF Scampton, Lincoln—United Kingdom MoD/Crown copyright

The Red Arrows Display over RAF Akrotiri, Cyprus 5 Hawks are shown performing the Tango formation.

The Red Arrows Display over RAF Akrotiri, Cyprus with five BAe  Hawks performing the Tango formation—United Kingdom MoD/Crown copyright

The Red Arrows are pictured flying over Scotland. The Royal Air Force Hawk jet aircraft comprise the world famous RAF Aerobatic Team.

The Red Arrows are pictured flying over Scotland—United Kingdom MoD/Crown copyright

The Red Arrows demonstrating their brand new tail fin design during a practice session over RAF Scampton in Lincolnshire. The Royal Air Force Aerobatic Team, the Red Arrows, has revealed a new Union flag-inspired design on its world-famous jets. Tailfins on the team’s Hawk aircraft have received the fresh look, reflecting British excellence. The makeover will be seen by millions of people every year, when the Red Arrows display both at home and overseas. Complete with flowing red, white and blue lines, the new design emphasises the team’s important role as a global ambassador for the United Kingdom and Royal Air Force.

The Red Arrows demonstrating their brand new tail fin design during a practice session over RAF Scampton in Lincolnshire—United Kingdom MoD/Crown copyright

Pictured are two aircraft of the Red Arrows Aerobatic Team flying The Synchro Pair. Reds 6 and 7, perform the highly popular opposition manoeuvres during this latter sections of their shows. The Royal Air Force Aerobatic Team, the Red Arrows, is one of the world's premier aerobatic display teams. Representing the speed, agility and precision of the RAF, the team is the public face of the service. They assist in recruiting to the Armed Forces, act as ambassadors for the United Kingdom and promote the best of British. Flying distinctive Hawk jets, the team is made up of pilots, engineers and essential support staff with frontline, operational experience.

Pictured are Red 6 and Red 7 flying The Synchro Pair Formation—United Kingdom MoD/Crown copyright

Armed Forces Day National Event Held in Cleethorpes - Sat 25 Jun 2016 Image shows: The RAF Aerobatic Team, The Red Arrows. Celebrations took place to mark the eighth annual Armed Forces Day, honouring the work and dedication of our brave Servicemen and women deployed around the world. More than 250 events including parades, military displays and community fetes are took place right across the country to say thank you to the Armed Forces community, including Regulars, Reserves, their families and veterans past and present. From fighting Daesh in the Middle East to training troops in Nigeria and supporting NATO exercises, the UK’s Armed Forces are on duty 24/7. Armed Forces Day is a chance for Britain to acknowledge their hard work and sacrifice. The National Event was held in the seaside town Cleethorpes, Lincolnshire, attended by His Royal Highness the Duke of Kent representing the Queen and the Royal Family.  Other guests included the Defence Secretary Michael Fallon, Minister of State for the Ministry of Defence and Deputy Leader of the House of Lords, The Rt Hon Earl Howe, the Commander of Joint Forces Command, General Sir Chris Deverell KCB MBE ADC and the Worshipful Mayor of North East Lincolnshire Christina McGilligan-Fell. The National Event began with a spectacular display from the Red Arrows, an amphibious display on the beach from the Royal Marines and a parachute drop from the RAF Falcons. A parade of Service personnel, veterans and cadets then marched down Cleethorpes seafront, from the North Promenade to the Boating Lake, followed by a motorcade of motorcyclists from the Armed Forces Bikers and the Royal British Legion bikers.  The Duke of Kent took the salute from the parade on behalf of The Queen and Royal Family. Afternoon celebrations in Cleethorpes continued across the seafront with a variety of military displays including the White Helmets Motorcycle Display Team. Overhead the Battle of Britain Memorial Flight, a Chinook and the Royal

The Red Arrows—United Kingdom MoD/Crown copyright

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The Red Arrows—United Kingdom MoD/Crown copyright

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The Red Arrows—United Kingdom MoD/Crown copyright

blog RIAT 2015 Red-Arrows smoke on Alex Horrox

The Red Arrows—United Kingdom MoD/Crown copyright